Community Event 2012 Abstracts and Bios

The Future Is Unmanned

Jörg Lamprecht, Aibotix | 13:30-14:30 – 23/10/2012 | Keynote

Abstract:
Modern electric multicopters have evolved over the years from simple hobby toys into sophisticated professional systems. They perform industrial inspections, count wildlife in Africa, and go where no human could safely go in disaster areas. They navigate almost independently with a broad range of onboard sensors and cameras, and transmit the videos and sensor data in real time to ground control stations.

In this keynote you will learn about the basic architecture of such copters and the challenges in replacing human eyes – all the way down to the mechanics of the camera stabilization system during flight.

Conference attendees can participate in the Eclipse Flight Club challenge by writing code to create a custom stabilizer. We will provide a special interface (Windows DLL) that receives the sensor data for the flight attitude of the copter, and controls the servo motors of the camera mount to overcome the nick and roll movements. Flight Club includes a full test set with copter, camera mount, live video show, and different approaches to stabilization.

Speaker Bio:

Jörg Lamprecht is the founder and CTO of Aibotix, a company with the mission to build the next generation of flying robots. Before Aibotix, he founded Qitera, a search-as-a service company; Cobion, a web security company; and ONLY Solutions, an industrial image-processing company.

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Cut the Gordian knot – The QIVICON eco system for smart home

Jochen Hiller, Carsten Otto, Deutsche Telekom AG | 14:30-15:00 – 23/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
There are lot of products available for smart homes – from do-it-yourself packages up to professional, exclusive or industrial solutions. Most of the available products are silo based – no easy integration of additional devices from multiple manufacturers, no additional wireless or wired communication options. Even the software environments are closed, customers are restricted to the available applications / configurations of their product provider. Deutsche Telekom is entering this smart home market as part of its Connected Life and Work strategy. Together with major international partners from different areas like utilities, white good manufactures, consumer electronics manufacturers and home automation vendors the QIVICON ecosystem has been announced. QIVICON will cut the Gordian knot to provide an open platform, for more protocols, devices from different vendors. QIVICON will provide an open platform, where the QIVICON partners and developers will provide their own smart home applications to the customer, which is free to choose the applications which fit his needs best. QIVICON is using common standards for Home Gateways which is heavily based on OSGi as core technology platform. Carsten Otto, responsible for the platform and partner management will present the concept and business rational behind QIVICON. [1] http://www.qivicon.com [2] http://www.heise.de/tr/artikel/Apps-fuers-Haus-1623638.html [3] http://www.telekom.com/medien/konzern/132298 [4] http://www.homegatewayinitiative.org/

Speaker Bio:

Carsten works for Deutsche Telekom AG since 2000. He started as a management trainee and then joined the product management department of T-Mobile in 2002. After leading international product introductions for more than five years he has been heading the Common Prioritization Management for four years looking after the planning and stage/gate process for common development projects and resources in Europe. Since 2011 Carsten is working for the newly formed Connected Home business unit within Deutsche Telekom being responsible for the platform business.

Carsten holds a diploma in communications engineering from the university of applied sciences in Cologne and a MBA from the university of Birmingham. Carsten lives in Bonn. After work he spends time with his wife and six year old daughter, goes jogging and plays basketball in a local club.

Jochen Hiller is working for Deutsche Telekom since 2004. He is using Object technologies since 1989, developing Smalltalk, C++, Java. He is a regular speaker at international conferences for component technologies based on OSGi. He is currently involved in a new OSGi based embedded platform for smart homes as product owner for the QIVICON Software Development Kit, developed by Deutsche Telekom. Jochen is member of OSGi Users’ Forum Germany and co-lead of the German enterprise working group.

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Best Practices for Enterprise OSGi Applications

Emily Jiang, IBM | 14:30-15:30 – 23/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
Since the first release of the OSGi Enterprise specification in March 2010 the use of OSGi in the enterprise has increased dramatically. Moving traditional Java EE applications to an OSGi stack is intentionally as easy as possible, however there are a number of common mistakes that can make it feel very hard. This session will describe some best practices for developing Enterprise OSGi applications and OSGi bundles, allowing developers to utilise the power of OSGi in a painless way. This talk is recommended to anyone who is looking to improve their OSGi principles.

Speaker Bio:

Emily Jiang is an OSGi and Liberty developer for WebSphere Application Server and works for IBM. Based at IBM’s Hursley laboratory in the UK, she has worked on WebSphere Application Server since 2006 and a senior developer on OSGi support in WebSphere Application Server. She is an active member of OSGi Enterprise Export Group. Emily also participates in open source projects. She is a committer of the Apache Aries project.

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Telecom Italia experiences of OSGi application in Home Networking context

Nicola Portinaro, Telecom Italia | 15:00-15:30 – 23/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
Telecom Italia is committed to OSGi use in home networking applications; a specific roadmap for the deployment of new services in the connected home, based on OSGi platform, has been already set up. The presentation outlines the TI general approach to OSGi framework implementation in the digital home and in particular on access gateways, and provides details on ongoing developments either with a “two-box” or a “single box” solution. After having mentioned the reference standards adopted, a description of successfully implemented OSGi prototypes is reported, with specific emphasis on Home Network Discovery and Diagnostics use case, but also mentioning other “smart home” typical scenarios such as home automation, energy management, e-health, and interaction with cloud platform and services.

Speaker Bio:

Nicola Portinaro is a senior developer and a system integrator at the R&D center of Telecom Italia (TILab). He received the degree of Electronic Engineering at the Polytechnic of Turin. Since 2009 he is actively working in developing home networking applications in OSGi.

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Enabling Applications & Services on Residential Gateways with OSGi

Ashu Joshi, Cisco | 15:30-16:00 – 23/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
This track will review Cisco’s perspective on the “business” need for enabling applications & services by leveraging OSGi on managed residential gateways. It will provide an overview of the challenges and opportunities in the Service Provider managed gateways being leveraged as a platform for new services & applications. The track will also cover how OSGi meets the requirements. And also address what needs to be done by the OSGi community to scale the OSGi ecosystem.

Speaker Bio:

Ashu Joshi is a successful technology executive experienced in business development, product management, and strategy with over 18 years in areas of Video Systems, Home Automation & Monitoring, Consumer Electronics, Storage Networking, and Embedded Systems. Ashu has demonstrated success in launching multiple products in companies ranging from to startups to very large.

  • Developed market & customer opportunities in North America, Europe, APAC and Middle East. Played pivotal role in capturing 15+ customers that generated revenues in excess of $600m.
  • Defined, planned and executed strategy on enabling new managed services for Cisco’s Service Provider customers such as Home Security, Monitoring & Automation (SMA); Energy Management, and eHealth. Defined and executed strategy to enable application and services on Residential Gateway platforms and dedicated application gateways. The scope of the new services included defining the strategy for both the software stack such as leveraging OSGi & Java; application partners and the hardware platforms.
  • Developed product strategy Cisco’s Video Technology Group (VTG) to converge Managed Video services with Over the Top (OTT) Video leading to the successful development of new hybrid Set Top Boxes (STBs) solution using rich media and enhanced user experience in consuming video content. Led the product management team for Cisco’s IPTV Solutions, and introduced new suite of STB solutions powered by Android, Adobe Flash and HTML technologies.
  • Early founding team member at iVivity – where he was principal firmware architect, and then VP of Technology. iVivity was a VC-funded startup building high speed silicon with multiple CPU cores and hardware accelerated TCP/IP engine. He was also instrumental in raising venture capital at iVivity, and building its software engineering team.
  • Built and managed Engineering Teams in North America, Taiwan, and India.

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How to Make Your Code OSGi-Friendly Without Depending on OSGi

Neil Bartlett, Paremus | 15:30-16:00 – 23/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
OSGi is increasingly important, but has not (yet) taken over the world. Unfortunately some libraries make mistakes that render them very difficult to use in OSGi — and also will make them difficult to use in other module systems such as Jigsaw. For example loading classes dynamically and making assumptions about where a class can be loaded from. In this short talk I will describe how to avoid making such mistakes, and how to build a library that is friendly towards OSGi and modularity in general, without actually tying it to OSGi.

Speaker Bio:

Neil Bartlett is an experienced software developer, consultant and trainer specialising in Java, OSGi, Eclipse and Haskell. Neil has been working with Paremus since 2009, joining full time in 2011 and has been working with OSGi technology since 2004.

His OSGi expertise is well recognized across the world and he has provided consulting and training for numerous organizations and individuals in many different countries. Neil is also a co-author and recognised trainer of OSGi technology.

Neil’s current passion is to make sure that development with OSGi is easier than developing with Java. To this end Neil is the creator of Bndtools which offers a plugin to Eclipse, leveraging Bnd, that makes it easy and productive to develop with OSGi..

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Developing Applications for Your Smart Home with QIVICON

Kai Kreuzer, Jochen Hiller and Andreas Kraft, Deutsche Telekom AG | 16:30-17:00 – 23/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
QIVICON is a new platform for the smart home market powered by Deutsche Telekom and based on OSGi technology. To leverage its open concept, QIVICON provides a powerful SDK as a toolbox for developing applications that can directly interact with sensors and actuators throughout your home. A device abstraction layer and a flexible query and filter mechanism allows to easily cross system borders between different protocols and hardware devices. For realizing a hassle-free installation and update experience, the service gateway can be fully provisioned by backend servers. This covers its firmware and applications as well as specific hardware drivers. In this session we will give you a live demonstration of the QIVICON SDK by developing and deploying an application to the service gateway and seeing the provisioning in action.

Speaker Bio:

Jochen Hiller is working for Deutsche Telekom since 2004. He is using Object technologies since 1989, developing Smalltalk, C++, Java. He is a regular speaker at international conferences for component technologies based on OSGi. He is currently involved in a new OSGi based embedded platform for smart homes as product owner for the QIVICON Software Development Kit, developed by Deutsche Telekom. Jochen is member of OSGi Users’ Forum Germany and co-lead of the German enterprise working group.
Andreas Kraft studied Computer Science at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. Since 2000 he works for Deutsche Telekom AG as a Senior Systems Architect in the field of Connected Home Services. His current activities include strategies for and design of OSGi based service architectures for connected homes. Before that, he was involved in the design and development of platforms for remote access and control of devices and services in residential homes. Andreas Kraft also represents Deutsche Telekom AG in standardization groups, such as ISO/IEC, CENELEC, the OSGi Alliance, and the UPnP Forum. His current involvements with the OSGi Alliance include co-chairing the Residential Expert Group as well as to be a board member of the OSGi Users’ Forum Germany.

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Is OSGi modularity always worth it?

Glyn Normington, SpringSource / VMware | 16:30-17:00 – 23/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
This talk describes how a popular, new open source server runtime project was adapted to use OSGi as a module system. The result was more loosely coupled and easier to test. However, in addition to the change of using OSGi as a runtime container, there was an interesting trade-off in thread safety. The talk will demonstrate how new modules were developed using the new Virgo tooling and discuss whether OSGi modularisation is always worth it.

Speaker Bio:

Glyn leads the Virgo project and is involved in some Gemini sub-projects. He is a member of the RT PMC. He works for the SpringSource division of VMware in Southampton, England.

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Reviving the Http Service

Felix Meschberger, Adobe Systems | 17:00-18:00 – 23/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
The OSGi Http Service is the original OSGi specification to write OSGi-based web applications. While it has its advantages being very simple to understand and use it has some drawbacks. The main drawback is the Http Service being based on the Servlet API 2.1 specification and thus not supporting filters. Another drawback is the limitation in the way servlets (and resources) can be mapped to HTTP request URIs when compared to the more elaborate functionality supported by the standard web application descriptors. RFP-150 aims to modernize the current specification adding support for filters, supporting whiteboard pattern style registration of servlets and filters, and more. This paper will be circulated in the community to gather feedback and additional requirements to revive the OSGi Http Service.

This talk will present the limitations of the current specification and present ideas on how to the proposed functionality could be implemented. References to the current implementation of some of the proposed extensions in the Apache Felix projects are given.

Speaker Bio:

Felix Meschberger currently works as a Principal Scientist leading an internal Apache Sling based platform project for use as the basis for all current and future Server-side and Cloud-based offerings. Prior to this assignment Felix invented the Apache Sling Web Application framework and during that development implemented the Apache Felix Configuration Admin Service (the current Configuration Admin Service RI) and Metatype Service implementations. Additionally Felix initiated the development of the Apache Felix Web Console to be able to remotely managed OSGi Frameworks and applications. Last but not least Felix currently maintains the Apache Felix implementation of the Declarative Services implementation. Felix works out of the Adobe Offices in Basel/Switzerland. He joined Day Management AG in Basel in 2000 and now works for Adobe Systems after Day has been acquired by Adobe in late 2010.

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Blasting Out of the Past with OSGi

Keith McFarlane, LiveOps, Inc. | 17:00-18:00 – 23/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
OSGi containers are well known as excellent platforms for development of new services and applications, but are generally undervalued as migration vehicles. Through OSGi, it is possible to reap the benefits of a layered, modular architecture without sacrificing the hard-earned stability of existing services; platform engineers can build an abstraction above the legacy world and expose this model as a consistent set of services, and application developers can write new applications that are independent of future changes to the back end. While there are many ways to achieve this separation of concerns, OSGi is uniquely qualified for this mission. At LiveOps, we are using OSGi to extend our scalable multi-tenant architecture and accelerate development of new features using this layered model. In this session, I’ll detail our architectural approach, technology choices, and plans for the future so that others might learn from our experiences, both positive and negative.

Speaker Bio:

Keith R. McFarlane is CTO, Cloud Platform & Telephony at LiveOps, Inc., a company that provides a cloud-based multichannel contact center platform and applications. He has 20 years of experience designing and developing large-scale contact center and CRM systems. He and his team are currently building a new OSGi-based application server for use in the LiveOps Contact Center Cloud.

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We Can Do Better – IBM’s Vision for the Next Generation of Java Runtimes

John Duimovich, IBM | 09:00-10:00 – 24/10/2012 | Keynote

Abstract:
There is no question that the Java platform is successful. There are mature high performance runtimes, a rich ecosystem with extensive libraries, a tools ecosystem, and broad innovative community supporting the platform. Even with all these great things, software development remains difficult, the reuse of components elusive, and new runtime requirements for cloud, multicore, big data, and security are pushing the limits of these runtimes.

By leveraging modularity and service architectures, coupled with runtime enhancements, we can enable continued innovation while maintaining compatibility, improving performance, and making it easier to create, evolve and reuse software components.

Come hear IBM’s Chief Technology Officer for Java give a technology perspective on what needs to change in Java to address the challenges of producing modular software in the future.

Speaker Bio:

John Duimovich, Java CTO and IBM distinguished engineer, has been the lead designer and implementer for the OTI/IBM virtual machine technology for the past twenty years. He played a key role in the development of the IBM J9 Virtual Machine, ENVY/Smalltalk, VA/Micro Edition, and VA/Java Java IDEs.

John also was involved in the creation of Eclipse, and is currently the project management committee lead for the Eclipse Tools project.

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Using OSGi as a Cloud Platform

Jan S. Rellermeyer, IBM | 10:30-11:30 – 24/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
OSGi has taught us the art of stop worrying and embracing dynamism through a well-defined lifecycle of modules and through loosely-coupled services. Cloud resources are inherently dynamic in their nature and undergo frequent changes either due to explicit management operations (adding and removing resources) or due to their volatility (sharing effects, failures). Therefore, it is not a reasonable assumption that monolithic software incapable of dynamic adaptation can effectively run in such an environment. In fact, the compositional approach of OSGi—traditionally applied to a single runtime system—is key to building scalable and dependable systems across a variable set of machines in the cloud.

In this talk, I will discuss the challenges and opportunities of using the OSGi framework as a cloud platform. Concretely, I will discuss which existing OSGi facilities (e.g., UserAdmin) can easily be leveraged in the cloud to connect to established cloud services. Furthermore, I will discuss a REST-style API for interacting with the framework, uploading new bundles, and managing applications running on a cloud-based framework. Finally, I will show how to use Remote Services to compose failure-resilient applications running across multiple frameworks. I will use small concrete applications and demonstrate them during the talk.

Speaker Bio:

Jan S. Rellermeyer received his MSc CS in Distributed Systems from ETH Zürich, Switzerland, in 2006 and completed his PhD in Computer Science in the Systems Group at ETH under the guidance of Prof. Gustavo Alonso and Prof. Timothy Roscoe in 2011. During this time, Jan has been the invited researcher of the OSGi Alliance and author and contributor to several successful open source projects, including his own small footprint OSGi R3 implementation Concierge, his distributed Remote Services for OSGi (R-OSGi) system, and the Eclipse ECF project. After graduation, Jan joined IBM Austin Research Lab where he works in the Future Systems Group. His research interests include mobile enterprise systems, cloud computing, modular software architecture, distributed systems, and language runtime systems.

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Building a modular Server Platform with OSGi

Harshana Eranga Martin, Dileepa Jayakody, WSO2 Inc| 10:30-11:30 – 24/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
OSGi, the dynamic modular system for Java, specifies an architecture to develop loosely coupled dynamic, component-based enterprise applications. However, taking full advantage of OSGi to create complex software in a dynamic and modular manner requires adhering to certain best practices and standards. Moreover, when implementing a componentized server platform using OSGi, it can be difficult to manage OSGi features, feature categories, and P2 repositories using Eclipse. This session will present developers with the real-world approaches and lessons learned in addressing these challenges to develop WSO2 Carbon, a free and open-source componentized middleware platform based on OSGi. Through discussions and demonstrations, attendees will learn how to:

* Ensure that each component has a core-runtime, a clean SOA interface, and a front-end console, which are self containing OSGi bundles.
* Use declarative services to extend the functionality of components in a consistent manner.
* Integrate third-party libraries, such as Apache Axis2, Apache Tomcat by wrapping them as Orbit bundles.
* Employ a “feature” concept to assemble components.
* Create a plug-in extension for Apache Maven to automatically generate OSGi features, feature categories, and P2 repositories with the Maven build tool.

Speaker Bio:

Harshana Eranga Martin is a Senior Software Engineer from WSO2 Inc. Leads the WSO2 Developer Studio Eclipse tooling product.

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One Click deployment on the Cloud,

Florian Bausch, Markus Holtermann, Harald Kornmayer, DHBW Mannheim | 11:30-12:00 – 24/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
Cloud computing is currently changing the IT delivery process of computing power, storage space and network capabilities. These resources are available from different providers and can be used to build applications within the Cloud. But the delivery of such applications is still a challenge as different Cloud providers come with different deployment mechanism. The user is hindered from using Cloud resources of different providers in scalable Cloud application. A solution for this problem will be demonstrated.

By re-using existing Eclipse technology from Equinox (www.eclipse.org/equinox), p2 (www.eclipse.org/equinox/p2), gEclipse (www.eclipse.org/geclipse) an interoperable Cloud deployment framework was developed within student projects as proof-of-concepts prototypes. With these prototypes the deployment of Cloud application can be as easy as the deployment of smartphone application. Based on a specific Cloud appliance containing an OSGi based runtime with p2 extensions, applications on Cloud compute resources can be easily managed with extensions to the gEclipse framework. The deployment is initiate with one click and does include cloud-side and client-side p2 provisioning operations.

The framework will be demonstrated by the following applications.

* a scalable simulation for astroparticle physics based on a legacy application.
* a OSGi application that adresses Cloud privacy by offering a service which distributes

data to various Cloud storage providers comparable to a RAID system

* a OSGi application that aggregates media data stored by different Cloud providers

The deployment of the Cloud application is supported by a Cloud Application Store which describes the required provisioning operations.

Speaker Bio:
Harald Kornmayer works as professor at DHBW Mannheim, Germany. He is a project lead of the g-Eclipse project and re-uses it in various new research projects. Harald is interested in Cloud computing, tooling for the Cloud, interoperable Cloud runtimes, distributed systems and scientific applications.

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Tales from the OSGi trenches

Bertrand Delacretaz | 11:30-12:00 – 24/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
In this talk we share our experience with the Apache Felix OSGi framework, used for a major rewrite of Adobe CQ5’s digital marketing product.

After about five years working with OSGi, the impact on our products, developers, customers and service people is very high, in a positive way. But OSGi is no silver bullet, and we will expose the ups and downs of our journey to help you get a better feel for what to expect when embracing it.

The extreme modularization and dynamic service deployment features of OSGi make our products much more robust and maintainable, but the costs associated with changing people’s way of thinking about code and modules, and with testing and debugging highly dynamic systems, must not be underestimated.

Based on real-life code samples, we will show how OSGi is used at several levels in our products, from low-level interactions with the framework to very simple creation of (compiled or scripted) services.

Sharing our experience will help you decide if OSGi is for you, and more importantly at which level you should use it.

Speaker Bio:

Bertrand Delacretaz works as a Senior Developer in the Adobe CQ5 R&D team, using open source tools to create world-class content management and digital marketing systems. Bertrand is an active member and current director of the Apache Software Foundation, involved in a number of other Apache projects as a committer, PMC member and incubation mentor.

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OSGi and Cloud Computing

David Bosschaert, Red Hat | 13:30-14:30 – 24/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
OSGi and Cloud Computing go very well together. Previously held OSGi Cloud Workshops have clearly shown that many people are using or planning to use OSGi in the Cloud. This session focuses on a demonstration of how OSGi can really help in a Cloud environment, taking advantage of OSGi’s dynamism and services model. The demo whill show how you can use OSGi to dynamically deploy an application in the cloud and use OSGi cloud discovery to hook the various entities together, each one potentially running in a different cloud node. The demo shows concepts such as dynamic provisioning, dynamic discovery, dynamic scaling and dynamic failover all from the OSGi programming model. I will also talk about cloud-related specification work relating to what is being demonstrated that is currently an active topic in the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group.

Speaker Bio:

David Bosschaert, Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, spends the majority of his time on the JBoss OSGi framework, JBoss AS7 and other open source projects. He is also co-chair of the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group.

Before joining JBoss/Red Hat in 2010, David worked for IONA Technologies and Progress Software in Dublin, Ireland.

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Everything you always wanted to know about Versions* (*but were afraid to ask)

Neil Bartlett, Paremus | 13:30-14:30 – 24/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
Versions are incredibly important in modern software development: they are the primary means by which we evolve software and communicate with other developers about the available features, compatibility and stability of our artifacts. OSGi is also the only environment where versions are used and enforced pervasively, and thus offers an ideal environment for growing and maintaining large software systems. And yet, many OSGi developers still don’t use versions properly. In fact some don’t even use them at all! Instead, organizations default to synchronous releases of all the modules in their domain… an approach which initially succeeds but ultimately fails to scale, especially when software is released to the outside world. Why is this??

Because proper versioning is complex, and because existing tools force the developer to manually maintain and reason about a very large number of versioned exports and imports. The number of versions to manage quickly exceeds the capacity of any human being.

But it doesn’t need to be this way; the problem is eminently manageable with tools. Developer should never have to remember to manually bump a version or reason about what range is required for a particular dependency.

In this talk I will first describe the correct use of versions in OSGi, both at the bundle and at package level. Next I will demonstrate new tools — based on bnd, Bndtools and the R5 repository/resolver specifications — that largely automate the process of version management, so that large software projects can be successfully evolved and released in a truly modular way.

Speaker Bio:

Neil Bartlett is an experienced software developer, consultant and trainer specialising in Java, OSGi, Eclipse and Haskell. Neil has been working with Paremus since 2009, joining full time in 2011 and has been working with OSGi technology since 2004.

His OSGi expertise is well recognized across the world and he has provided consulting and training for numerous organizations and individuals in many different countries. Neil is also a co-author and recognised trainer of OSGi technology.

Neil’s current passion is to make sure that development with OSGi is easier than developing with Java. To this end Neil is the creator of Bndtools which offers a plugin to Eclipse, leveraging Bnd, that makes it easy and productive to develop with OSGi.

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Liberate your components with OSGi services

Simon Maple, IBM | 14:30-15:00 – 24/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
Converting any large application to be OSGi based is a difficult and complex process. Many projects find the fences that OSGi put in place puts insurmountable barriers in the way of success. Many projects get a short way through to embrace the concept of modules, but frequently they get no further and as a result they do not see the many benefits of OSGi. In this talk the speaker will discuss the trails and tribulations of moving a large software product (WebSphere Application Server) to being based on OSGi and how the new liberty profile embraces OSGi services to produce a more lightweight and flexible server runtime.

For those aware of the Modularity Maturity Model the liberty project aims to move WebSphere Application Server from Level 2 to Level 6.

Speaker Bio:

Simon Maple is a technical evangelist, working for IBM on WebSphere Application Server Liberty Profile. Previously he has worked as a tester and developer on WebSphere Application Server since v4. His current focus is on developer experience and has recently been playing with IBM software on a Raspberry Pi.

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OSGi in Java EE servers: sneak peek under the hood

Krasimir Semerdzhiev, SAP | 14:30-15:00 – 24/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
A number of Java EE servers have already leveraged OSGi as their modularization of choice to better structure the runtime. At the same time – very few of them are actually exposing Java EE applications as OSGi bundles or allowing them to consume OSGi functionality at all. The talk has the goal to provide an overview on how the most popular free Java EE servers leverage OSGi and give some hints for what can JAva EE apps do to benefit out of that.

Speaker Bio:
Coming soon.

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Hints and Tips for Migrating Existing Enterprise Applications to OSGi

Graham Charters, IBM | 15:30-16:30 – 24/10/2012 | Track 1

Abstract:
Lack of modularity is one of the biggest challenges when it comes to making your enterprise applications more flexible and extensible. Without strong modularity, systems become entangled and brittle and development teams become afraid to make changes for fear of breaking things – the application becomes a real bottleneck to business progress. So, you’ve decided you want to adopt OSGi to improve the agility of your enterprise applications, but where do you start? What are the strategies that people have found most successful? What tools are there to help with the task? This talk will outline strategies for moving existing enterprise applications to OSGi. It will share approaches that have been shown to succeed at addressing some of the challenges you’ll meet along the way, and will introduce some of the tools that make the job a whole lot easier. All this will be accompanied by examples taken from migrating a representative Java EE application.

Speaker Bio:

Graham Charters is a Senior Technical Staff Member in the IBM WebSphere Application Server development organization. He is responsible for the OSGi Applications feature of the Application Server and is the IBM technical lead in the OSGi Alliance Enterprise Expert Group. He is also a committer and PMC member of the Apache Aries OSGi programming model project.

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Native-OSGi, Modular Software Development in a Native world

Alexander Broekhuis, Luminis and Sascha Zelzer | 15:30-16:30 – 24/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
Where creating modular, loosely-coupled, and dynamic software components on the Java platform is becoming the de-facto standard, this is not yet the case for (embedded) native software, mainly due to a lack of standardized solutions. To fill this gap, several native OSGi like implementations currently exist, but they all provide their own implementation and design. To be able to reuse bundles from different implementations, more information and specifications are needed. The Native-OSGi project is a collaboration of the Apache Celix incubation project, the CTK Plugin Framework project, and the nOSGi project. The goal of Native-OSGi is to define a common specification which can be used by C and C++ OSGi like implementations. It focusses on the API, bundle format and any other aspect which needs to be lined up. For this, the OSGi specification will be taken as a starting point. It can, at least, partially be seen as a continuation of OSGi RFP-89, Universal OSGi which was started in 2007, but never took of. To keep the scope maintainable and limited, Native-OSGi will focus strictly on C and C++ and on enabling transparent interoperability between C and C++ bundles via services while staying close to the programming model of the specific language.

During this talk we will share our experiences with translating the OSGi specification/concepts to a native environment and present the current state of Native-OSGi. While the first part will give you a high-level overview, the second part will go into the details of the specifics of a native OSGi specification and show how it can solve common problems of modular, loosely coupled native software development.

More information about the different project can be found at their websites:

More information about the Native-OSGi project can be found at the Native-OSGi GitHub page:https://github.com/abroekhuis/NativeOSGi

Speaker Bio:

Alexander Broekhuis works for Luminis and is a Java engineer since 2004 with a clear focus on OSGi. In the last years he has worked for embedded product companies on distributed middleware in which Java and C is used. His work includes creating meta-models and transformations from which the code for the middleware is generated (MDA, MDD), and more recently updating existing middleware to support dynamic services, based on OSGi. Alexander is initiator and committer of the Apache Celix project, a platform for distributed systems in C, with a focus on interoperability with Java (OSGi).
Sascha Zelzer studied Theoretical Physics in Austria and has been working with Java and C++ for the last ten years. While working on his Ph.D. at the German Cancer Research Center, he is also deeply involved in developing and maintaining a large C++ software stack primarily focused on medical imaging platforms. His current interests include modularized and distributed systems in C++, especially how to leverage the benefits of OSGi technology in a native environment.

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Clearing Up Class Loading Problems in OSGi Based Systems

Sameera Jayasoma, WSO2 Inc| 16:30-17:30 – 2410/2012 |”’ Track 1

Abstract:
A class loading architecture is a foundational element that enables the modularity of OSGi. Each OSGI bundle has a separate class loader, which it uses to share or hide classes and resources. However, within OSGI, the bundles has to delegate class loading to other bundles, and therefore, OSGI class loading is much different from normal java class loading. Due to these complexities in OSGi, there are many ways a developer can go wrong when developing OSGi bundles. Moreover, since the cause of these problems are not always obvious, diagnosing and determining a solution to class loading problems can be very time consuming. Most of these problems occur due the incorrect wiring between exporters and importers of packages which can be tedious to resolve.

In this talk, I will discuss various class loading problems and how to avoid them using real world examples. Due to the excessive involvement of developing OSGI based systems(WSO2 Carbon – Open source enterprise middleware), I’ve faced many real world class loading issues. Guiding OSGi developers on how to solve common class loading issues as well as discussing about the best practises, they can apply to avoid these issues will be important for developers. Therefore starting from a brief introduction to the class loading architecture in OSGi, I will explain how to diagnose and resolve some common OSGI problems ranging from simple errors like ClassNotFoundException, NoClassDefFoundError to more challenging problems such as ClassCast exceptions and loader constraint violations.

Speaker Bio:
Sameera is a Senior Technical Lead and a member of the management committee, cloud and platform technology group in WSO2 Inc. He is the OSGi lead of the WSO2 Carbon platform, the base framework for all WSO2 products and has over 4 years of experience in working with OSGi based systems. A graduate of University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka, Sameera holds a first class degree in B.Sc. Engineering, specializing in Computer Science and Engineering.

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CICS and Java – OSGi within business critical mainframe environments

Tobias Leicher, IBM | 16:30-17:30 – 24/10/2012 | Track 2

Abstract:
This talk is about the OSGi integration in the transaction monitor CICS. CICS is the leading Mainframe transaction monitor in the world and is used by many Fortune 500 companies. The traditional languages on mainframes are COBOL and PL/I but in the last years Java became more and more important.

CICS reacts to those requirements in several steps. At first a JVM was integrated to run single threads within CICS as user programs. This concept was very inflexible and was not adopted quite often. But with Version 4.2 CICS introduced a OSGi runtime in CICS and today it is possible to create high performant Java applications that are able to profit from all the Mainframe capabilities, like 99.999% availability or hardware cryptography.

In this session the specialties of the Mainframe, CICS, its implementation of OSGi (Equinox is used) as well as potential use cases will be shown, including a small demonstration.

Speaker Bio:
After my Studies at the Cooperative University of Baden Wuerthemberg in the area of Information Technology I am working in the area of mainframe computing. Here I work with the IBM middleware CICS, especially with the java and OSGi support.

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Welcome to the New Web

Chris Heilmann, Mozilla | 09:00-10:00 – 25/10/2012 | Keynote

Abstract:
In the recent years we’ve seen a massive change in the world of web development. Originally we had a world of servers and clients that simply displayed what was sent to them, but mobile computing and new HTML5 technologies have changed everything. More and more computing work is done on the client, since we cannot expect solid and fast connectivity. It is very impressive just how many opportunities modern browsers give us.

In this keynote, Chris Heilmann of Mozilla will show you just how much you can do on your end user’s computers and phones without bothering your servers. You’ll also learn about Boot2Gecko or how Mozilla managed to bring the web to a world of closed devices to allow everybody to benefit from these advancements without spending thousands. We have the technology and we have the tools; all we need now is to work together and the web of tomorrow will be open, free, and still a joy to use.

Speaker Bio:
Chris Heilmann has dedicated a lot of his time making the web better. He built his first website around 1997 and during the following years worked on lots of large, international websites. Chris then spent a few years at Yahoo building products and training people, and is now at Mozilla.

Chris wrote and contributed to four books on web development, and has written many articles and hundreds of blog posts for Ajaxian, Smashingmagazine, Yahoo, Mozilla, ScriptJunkie, and more.

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Workflow for development, release and versioning with OSGi/bndtools: real-world challenges

Marian Grigoras and Dieter Bogdoll | 10:30-11:30 – 25/10/2012 | Room 8

Abstract:
Seeing the advantages of the OSGi modularity level, we want to introduce it into our daily workflow, based on Eclipse and the bndtools plugin.

In this talk we concentrate on the modularity level, independent of whether the service layer is used or not. Initial requirements for our research group at Siemens, Corporate Technology include:

* integration of OSGi with the currently-used VCS (subversion, hg, git)
* integration of OSGi with our Jenkins CI server
* automated creation of deployable applications, which might include a collection of artifacts, start scripts, installers
* workflow easy of use for developers
* meaningful bundle/package versions

As this process proved less straightforward than one might expect, we present the challenges we encountered, such as:

* consistent versioning of bundles – both the conventions and the tooling support
* internal bundle release for the other developers
* reproducible deployment artifacts for external customers
* partial checkouts: checkout from a VCS repository only the projects relevant for the current developer task, without all the required dependencies (both third party and intra-project dependencies)
* usage of remote OBRs with mandatory authorization
* heterogeneous development OSs (windows, linux)

In this talk we document our quest for a practical workflow: the relevant use cases, the analyzed solutions, the various criteria that came into play and, finally, the chosen solution for our team.

Speaker Bio:
Dieter Bogdoll is a software architect at Siemens Corporate Technology where he is working in the research group “Learning Systems”. Here he creates software architectures and processes that helps the team to create customer solutions based on neural networks technologies and machine learning algorithms. Particularly he is interested in solutions which work well on streaming data and the efficient storage and retrieval of big data. Dieter Bogdoll holds a Computer Engineering degree from the Technical University of Munich, Germany.

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Practical OSGi Subsystems

Glyn Normington, SpringSource / VMware | 11:30-12:00 – 25/10/2012 | Room 8

Abstract:
The OSGi Subsystems specification is now published. Subsystems provide a way of structuring large systems comprising many OSGi bundles – a “no brainer” for architects who want to build a modular system. But what are the practical considerations when using Subsystems? We’ll look at the trade-offs involved and indicate some patterns and anti-patterns. Eclipse Virgo was one of the technologies that provided input to the Subsystem specification. We’ll use Virgo as a source of examples in discussing the practical trade-offs in the use of Subsystems.

Speaker Bio:

Glyn leads the Virgo project and is involved in some Gemini sub-projects. He is a member of the RT PMC. He works for the SpringSource division of VMware in Southampton, England.

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Universal Declarative Services

Simon Chemouil, Global Vision Systems | 13:30-14:30 – 25/10/2012 | Room 8

Abstract:
Context: In the Java ecosystem, OSGi has become the de facto standard to deal with modularity and dynamic components. After more than ten years of maturation, elegant techniques and models have been developed and are successfully in use: semantic versioning, fine-grained dependency management, simple yet expressive component models, and a modular core still simple.

Universal OSGi Native C/C++ OSGi frameworks, an initiative dubbed “Universal OSGi”, are bringing the OSGi platform and its service model to our bare operating systems. A few projects have implemented OSGi-like light containers for both C and C++, and an effort is starting to come up with common specifications.

Yet so far an important brick of the OSGi stack has been left aside: Declarative Services, a service component framework that comes with a simple component model, hides OSGi API concepts (and removes dependencies on all but business code), makes component testable and shields the developer from dealing too much with of the dynamism of µServices. All said, it’s a formidable enabler and makes OSGi programming easy.

However, Declarative Services is a subtle mix of a service component model and dependency injection, and uses techniques such as reflection that are not available in C++.

Native C++ Declarative Services This first part of this talk will be about our experience implementing Declaratives Services for C++! We will see why the Declarative Services specification makes sense for C++, how most technical limitations were overcome and which are still open. We will also address the challenge of designing C++ components to achieve modularity in a world without a garbage collector, and see how popular OSGi design patterns have to be adapted!

Universal Declarative Services with Model-Driven Development Going “Universal” is a step further from just having separate Java and C++ implementations of Declarative Services: our long-term goal is to have components in both languages directly interacting through “bridged” services, so the chosen implementation language should be insignificant when designing the components. Model-driven development comes to the rescue!

Using the Eclipse Xtext meta-programming framework, we can easily define a small domain specific language capturing the essence of Declarative Services metadata. Components described in our ADL can then have their skeletons generated in Java or in C++ along with the required configuration.

This top-down, model-driven approach will be presented as one way to develop Universal OSGi systems, mixed with Java or C++ parts (and, later, other languages?!). During the second part of the talk we will see the toolchain — and Eclipse IDE environment — we developed, along with the Architecture Description Language (ADL) to make it easy to create components. During a live demo, we will see how C++ DS components can be generated and implemented easily without writing technical code.

Speaker Bio:

Simon Chemouil is software architect at Global Vision Systems in Toulouse, France, where brings OSGi know-how to products using Java/Eclipse RCP, C++ and Android. He kept a deep interest for functional programming from his background in theoretical computer science and is now focused on mixing functional techniques with service/component-oriented architecture to make software modular and robust.

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Structuring software systems with OSGi

Tommaso Teofili, Adobe| 14:30-15:00 – 25/10/2012 |”’ Room 8

Abstract:
Adapting a not OSGi framework to OSGi based architectures is often a common need which needs to be managed together with other concerns like backward compatibility, multiple components packaging, evolution and flexibility. Handling such needs can be tricky because of possible hurdles related to different class loading models, fine grained dependency management, semantic versioning, etc.

This talk deals with a real life use case of adapting a not OSGi ready framework like Apache UIMA to a fully OSGi based architecture for the Apache Clerezza project highlighting how the different class loading mechanisms (not OSGI vs OSGi) can be handled and adapted and how the two frameworks can be integrated leveraging the OSGi capabilities and still maintaing backward compatibility, flexibility, etc..

Speaker Bio:
Coming soon.

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