2017 Community Event Speaker Abstracts and Bios

Bndtools and Maven: A brave new world

Neil Bartlett, Tim Ward [Paremus] | 09:00-12:00 – 24/10/2017 | Tutorial – Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

The Bndtools project is the foremost IDE for OSGi development, with a powerful workspace model and interactive debug sessions. Historically Bndtools has been opinionated (and restrictive) about how you build your workspace, but with the new releases of bnd and Bndtools 3.4.0 things have changed dramatically.

Using the new Maven plugins from the bnd project you can now get all the bnd goodness you know and love when using Maven, and when using Bndtools you still get incremental building and interactive debug! This talk will walk you through the new Maven plugins from bnd, and how to get the most out of your new favourite IDE.

The bnd project has provided OSGi build tooling for many years, offering variously a command line build, Ant tasks, a Gradle plugin and a Maven plugin. The primary IDE integration efforts for bnd have focussed on bnd’s workspace model, lately using Gradle, but very much separate from the Maven development model.

As a popular, widely used toolchain Maven support has long been requested in Bndtools, but only now, after significant changes to support standalone projects has it really been possible to see Maven as an equal part of the Bndtools ecosystem. The Bndtools 3.4.0 release is therefore a huge step forward for OSGi development, and we’re sure that you’ll agree.

Speaker Bios:

Neil Bartlett

Neil Bartlett is a principal engineer, consultant, trainer and developer with Paremus. Neil has been working with Java since 1998 and OSGi since 2003 and specialises in Java, OSGi and Eclipse. He is the founder of the Bndtools eclipse plugin project, the leading IDE for OSGi. He can often be found on twitter (@nbartlett) tweeting on all things #OSGi and answering questions on Stack Overflow where he is the only holder of a gold OSGi badge. Neil regularly contributes to the Paremus Blogs and is also writing his second book “Effective OSGi” which will show developers how to quickly accelerate their productivity with OSGi using the latest techniques and tools.

Tim Ward

Tim Ward is CTO at Paremus Ltd, a co-author of Enterprise OSGi in Action, and has been  actively working with OSGi for over seven years. Tim has been a regular participant in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups, and is interim chair of the OSGi IoT Expert Group. Tim has led development of several specifications within OSGi. Tim is also an active Open Source committer. Tim contributes regularly to Bndtools and is a PMC member in the Apache Aries project.

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Digitalization – The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

[Anna Ståhlbröst [Luleå University of Technology] | 13:30-14:15  – 24/10/2017 | Keynote

Abstract:
EclipseCon Europe Keynote

Experience level: Beginner

Digitalization is here. It is real and it affects all aspects of human life. The use of digital innovations creates different consequences for humans, organizations, and societies. Some of these consequences are intentional and calculated, while others are unintentional and unforeseen.

Sometimes these unintentional consequences offer great opportunities that no one could have anticipated, but sometimes these unintentional consequences have negative effects that perhaps could have been avoided. In this presentation, digitalization is viewed from many different perspectives, focusing on the human aspect of digitalization and its consequences.

Speaker Bio:

Anna Ståhlbröst is associate professor in information systems at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. Her research is focused on processes for multi-stakeholder engagement in the development of digital innovations for smart cities and regions, i.e. Living Labs. Anna is especially interested in methods and tools that put emphasis on value-driven design. Her research is related to different application areas such as smart cities and regions, crowdsourcing, everyday use, and online privacy. Her research has been published in several international journals, conferences, and in books.

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Microservices with OSGi

Dirk Fauth [Robert Bosch GmbH], Peter Kirschner [Kirschners GmbH] | 14:30-15:05 – 24/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Intermediate

OSGi declarative services exist for a long time and are used to implement a modular service-oriented architecture. Because of the supported dynamics, the easy way to define, register and consume services, declarative services can be found in various scenarios. Using several of the long time existing specifications like Declarative Service, ConfigurationAdmin, EventAdmin and Remote Service Admin, it is also easy to setup the currently hyped micro services by using OSGi declarative services.

Speaker Bio:

Dirk Fauth is a Software Architect for Rich Client Systems working for the Robert Bosch GmbH in Stuttgart and a lecturer in Java basics for the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University (DHBW). He is active in developing, teaching and talking about Eclipse RCP applications and Eclipse related technologies. He is project lead of the Nebula NatTable project, Eclipse Platform committer and also a committer and contributor to several other Eclipse projects. He is also blogging about NatTable, Eclipse and OSGi on http://blog.vogella.com/author/fipro/ and https://blog.codecentric.de/en/author/dirk-fauth/
Peter is CEO at Kirschners GmbH, Germany

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Modeling the OSGi way

Simon Chemouil [Lambdacube] | 14:30-15:05 – 24/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

In an ideal world, business code would be decoupled from implementation details. It would be domain driven and self-contained; it would live in a single location, and that would make it easier to maintain.

Speaker Bio:

Simon works as a software architect and builds distributed systems. On a never-ending quest to build robust software, he focuses on modeling (a.k.a solving the right problem), correctness, performance and maintainability. Modular thinking and design is a necessary approach to succeed in meeting these goals, and OSGi is the way to make it happen in Java ; that’s what Simon has been doing for the better part of the last decade. Other interests include data science and machine learning, language theory and formal specifications, cryptocurrencies, and new computing models.

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Ticket to Ride – Bus Fleet Operated and Managed with OSGi

Christer Larsson [Makewave AB] | 15:15-15:50 – 24/10/2017 |Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Beginner

This talk will explain how OSGi is used in a large bus fleet system. Every bus has one or more on-board computers running an embedded OSGi platform (Knopflerfish) performing services such as ticketing, driver console, and passenger information. The system is remotely managed by Makewave’s Ubicore system, responsible for provisioning new or updated services to the embedded OSGi platforms. The talk will present an overview of the overall software architecture, some of the challenges we faced and the benefits gained by using OSGi.

Speaker Bio:

Christer Larsson is CEO and Co-founder Makewave AB.

Christer has over 20 years of experience in business development and advanced systems design for high-tech companies with experience from the automotive, airline and telecom industries working for such companies as Volvo IT, Carmen Systems and Ericsson.

Christer has been involved in the development of the OSGi technology since 1998, taking part in the design of Ericsson’s e-box concept which influenced the first releases of the OSGi specification to a large degree. He is currently the CEO of Makewave and the VP EMEA of  the OSGi Alliance. Christer is also deeply involved in the open source OSGi project Knopflerfish.

M.Sc., Chalmers University of Technology 1991

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Scaling up development of a modular code base

Robert Munteau [Adobe Systems Inc.] | 15:15-15:50 – 24/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

OSGi offers developers excellent tools for creating modular applications. We have come to have a good understanding of the runtime impact of modularity, but less have been spoken of the impact of modularity on the development process.

This talk will discuss the details of moving a large OSGi project from a single monolithic codebase to multiple repositories in terms of the development process. We will present the impact of modularisation on source control, continuous integration, code reviews, IDEs and public discussion on chat/email.

Speaker Bios:

Working as a Senior Computer Scientist at Adobe, Robert Munteanu is a software developer with a passion for Open Source. He is a frequent contributor to Open Source projects, such as Apache Sling, MantisBT and the Eclipse Plugin for ReviewBoard. Robert is a frequent conference speaker, including Devoxx, ApacheCon and EclipseCon.

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From logging to monitoring to reactive insights

Christian Schneider [Adobe] | 16:15-16:50 – 24/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Intermediate.

In a highly distributed world it is crucial to have the best possible insights into your application.

In the old days we achieved this using plain logging and jmx. This does not scale well to highly distributed processing like in microservices though.

 

Speaker Bio:

Christian is an Open Source Architect at Talend who works full time at Apache Software Foundation projects (Karaf, Aries, CXF, Camel). He was the responsible architect for the Services Oriented Architecture of EnBW Trading GmbH (Trading floor of one of Germany’s largest utility companies). He specializes in OSGi and practical integration solutions and is a regular speaker at several Java conferences.

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OSGi meets Lambdas

Carlos Sierra | 16:15-16:50 – 24/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner.

Functional programming has arrived in Java language and it has plans to stay. In this talk I will introduce Apache Aries Component DSL, a proof of concept functional library that aims to ease the way in which we can interact with OSGi in a composable and safe way.

If you come to this talk you will learn new approaches of reusing your existing java classes inside the OSGi framework without the need to use annotations or even XML, just lambdas in a stream like API. This library is currently being used to develop the reference implementation of JAX-RS OSGi specification. This can open OSGi to other JVM targeted languages, such as Scala or Eta, that provide specific syntax to functional type classes such as Monads or Applicatives.

Speaker Bio:

Coming soon.

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Leveraging the latest OSGi R7 Specifications

Carsten Ziegeler [Abobe], David Bosschaert | 17:00-17:35 – 24/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Whether you’re building large enterprise applications or writing code for IoT devices, the new R7 release has a lot to offer for you. Learn in this session about the various new and updated specifications and how they will make your developer life easier. Starting with new features in Declarative Services for component development, dealing with configurations, using JAX-RS with OSGi and finishing with useful libraries for object conversion and event streaming, this session is packed with information for OSGi development.

Speaker Bios:

Carsten Ziegeler is working at Adobe Research Switzerland and spends most of his time on architectural and infrastructure topics. Working for over 25 years in open source projects, Carsten is a member of the Apache Software Foundation and heavily participates in several Apache communities including Sling, Felix and ACE. He is a frequent speaker on technology and open source conferences. Carsten participates in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups and is a member of the OSGi Alliance board.
David Bosschaert works for Adobe Research and Development. He spends the much of his time on technology relating to OSGi in Apache and other open source projects. He is also co-chair of the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group and an active participant in the OSGi Cloud efforts. Before joining Adobe, David worked for Red Hat/JBoss and IONA Technologies in Dublin, Ireland.

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Big-Data reactive streams and OSGi

Matteo Rulli | 17:00-17:35 – 24/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

One of the basic requirement to enable big-data analytics is a rational and effective approach to data ingestion. In long running projects the need arises to evolve the domain model and this potentially affects data quality. As a consequence, the concept of versioning is crucial to keep data centric systems consistent: the importance of service dynamicity and good modularity support in a sound data ingestion workflow implementation cannot be easily overestimated.

Speaker Bio:

Matteo Rulli is the founder of FlairBit, a company focused on delivering data-centric, scalable, end-to-end solutions for the Industrial Internet of Things. Matteo has been working with OSGi since 2009 and he adopted this fantastic technology as the mainstay for all FlairBit backend developments and services. Before starting-up FlairBit, Matteo had the chance of to ride the IoT wave from the very beginning and led the development of many successful IoT projects and solutions.

FlairBit delivers end-to-end Internet of Things (IoT) solutions, providing tools and services to quickly integrate online data processing, Big-Data and Analytics into a flexible and modular IoT technology stack. FlairBit data centric solutions are the crossroad between powerful analytics tools and customer’s operational data streams unlocking the value of IoT data

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Journey from Monolith to a Modularized Application: Approach and Key Learnings

Emanoel Xavier [Intel] & Tim Ward [Paremus] | 09:00-09:45 – 25/10/2017 | Keynote

Abstract:
OSGi Community Event Keynote

Open Security Controller (OSC) aims to increase the security of workloads running in cloud and data centers by orchestrating security virtual network functions (VNFs). To achieve that, one of the main design goals of OSC is to allow vendor customization while keeping its core code neutral. Additionally, as an open source project, another import design principal for OSC is code habitability. Evolving from a legacy monolithic application to a modularized one through OSGi has enabled OSC to implement these goals.

Bringing together a diverse group of security services and software defined network (SDN) providers was key to building the OSC community. This was possible due to the OSC plugin model using OSGi which allows specific vendors to integrate OSC with their existing solutions with minimum effort. Beyond its plugin model OSC also makes use of OSGi in its core components. This enables better extensibility, testability and overall maintainability of its code base. These aspects are key to OSC as it relates to the new and dynamic areas of SDN and security VNFs in cloud and data center environments and it must be able to easily adapt to the constantly changing requirements and technologies pertaining these fields.

In this talk we will explore the journey for turning OSC into a modularized application using OSGi, highlighting some of the achieved results, key learned lessons and the next steps for this work.

https://www.opensecuritycontroller.org/

Speaker Bios:

Emanoel Xavier

Emanoel Xavier is a senior software developer in the Intel Platform Security Division. Responsible for developing security solutions for cloud and data center infrastructures based on software defined networks (SDN) and virtualization technologies such as OpenStack and Kubernetes. As one of the development leads on the modularisation of Open Security Controller (OSC) Emanoel is ideally placed to share the project experiences of the migration to OSGi. Prior to Intel, Emanoel worked for Microsoft, enabling billing, payments and retail SaaS solutions on the cloud with focus on identity and authentication, making the best use of protocols like OAuth and OpenId. During the course of his career he was also dedicated to the quality aspects of his projects, defining feature, functional and unit test approaches for various services and applications.

Tim Ward

Tim Ward is CTO at Paremus Ltd, a co-author of Enterprise OSGi in Action, and has been actively working with OSGi for the last decade.

In the OSGi Alliance Tim has been a regular participant in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups, and is co-chair of the OSGi IoT Expert Group. Tim has led development of several specifications within OSGi. Tim is also an active Open Source committer, he contributes regularly to the Bndtools project and is a PMC member in the Apache Aries project.

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Run OSGi on your robot and teach it new tricks

Tim Verbelen [imec] | 10:30-11:05 – 25/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Recent and upcoming OSGi specifications such as Promises and PushStreams provide great tools for asynchronous programming in Java. This is particulary useful for programming robots, where issuing a command is inherintly aync from observing the effect. In this talk we will present an asynchronous OSGi service for controlling a Kuka robot. Moreover, OSGi modularity allows us to easily integrate our robot with other systems. For example in our research, we connect several sensors to the robot, and use deep learning techniques to let the robot learn new behaviors from this sensor information.

Speaker Bio:

Tim Verbelen received his M.Sc. degree in Computer Science from Ghent University, Belgium, in June 2009. In July 2013, he received his Ph.D. degree with his dissertation “Adaptive Offloading and Configuration of Resource Intensive Mobile Applications.” Since August 2009, he has been working at the Department of Information Technology (INTEC) of the Faculty of Engineering at Ghent University, and is now active as postdoctoral researcher. His main research interests include mobile cloud computing and adaptive software. Specifically he is researching adaptive strategies to enhance real-time applications such as Augmented Reality on mobile devices.

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Eclipse RCP with bndtools

Peter Kirchner [Kirschners GmbH], Dirk Fauth [Robert Bosch GmbH] | 10:30-11:05 – 25/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

This talk is for Eclipse RCP developers who want to learn the OSGi way of developing bundles. If you are tired of setting targets and debugging PDE or target issues 😉 come and have a look at the alternative – bndtools. Bndtools offers a great alternative with powerful concepts and opportunities.

We explain how to start developing a Eclipse 4.x application from scratch inside bndtools. You see how you can deal with your dependencies in target setups on p2, file or maven based repositories. Learn how to develop, debug and build your Eclipse RCP application based on the bnd workspace template for RCP developers.

Speaker Bio:

Dirk Fauth is a Software Architect for Rich Client Systems working for the Robert Bosch GmbH in Stuttgart and a lecturer in Java basics for the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University (DHBW). He is active in developing, teaching and talking about Eclipse RCP applications and Eclipse related technologies. He is project lead of the Nebula NatTable project, Eclipse Platform committer and also a committer and contributor to several other Eclipse projects. He is also blogging about NatTable, Eclipse and OSGi on http://blog.vogella.com/author/fipro/ and https://blog.codecentric.de/en/author/dirk-fauth/
Peter is CEO at Kirschners GmbH, Germany

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OSGi and EEBs: Use cases for electric vehicle charging stations, heating systems and home appliances

Kai Hackbarth [Bosch Software Innovations GmbH] | 11:15-11:50 – 25/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

This talk will introduce some use cases of real world solutions that Bosch Software Innovations customers have implemented for electric vehicle charging stations,heating systems and home appliances using OSGi and EEBus.

EEBus is a German initiative that aims to standardize a global language for devices communicating with each other about energy. Bosch Software Innovations implemented the EEBus SHIP and SPINE specifications for its OSGi based ProSyst Gateway Stack.

The talk will conclude with a review of the benefits that are achieved with a joint OSGi and EEBus solution.

Speaker Bio:

Kai Hackbarth is an Evangelist at Bosch Software Innovations. He has been deeply involved in the technical standardization activities of the OSGi Alliance for more than 15 years. Kai is a member of the OSGi Alliance Board of Directors and has been co-chair of the OSGi Residential Expert Group since 2008. Kai is coordinating several research project activities in various IoT domains. His key focus areas are smart homes, automotive, and the Internet of Things in general, where he actively supports the current developments and strategic positioning of the product portfolio.

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Reactive OSGi meets Reactive Java – Don’t cross the streams?

Tim Ward [Paremus] | 11:15-11:50 – 25/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Data collection, filtering and processing is a growing concern for all sorts of applications. A variety of different libraries have been created, all looking to solve the same sorts of problems. The OSGi Alliance has defined the PushStream with a simple streaming API, but Reactive Streams and Java 9’s Flow API use a the Observable model. Which is better? Do I have to use OSGi if I choose Push Streams? Do I have to choose one library or can I use both?

This talk will describe the basic design differences between Push Streams and Observable streams,  showing side-by-side examples using both APIs. It will also show how one stream type can be converted into the other, and back meaning that you can always choose the appropriate tool for the job.

With Java 9 and OSGi Push Streams available to developers it has never been a better time to start learning what the new frontiers of streaming Java applications look like. Whether you are looking to process data events from IoT devices, collect metrics from cloud services, or simply to interact with messaging systems, reactive models let you build simple, high throughput systems with ease.

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Speaker Bios:

Tim Ward is CTO at Paremus Ltd, a co-author of Enterprise OSGi in Action, and has been actively working with OSGi for over seven years. Tim has been a regular participant in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups, and is interim chair of the OSGi IoT Expert Group. Tim has led development of several specifications within OSGi. Tim is also an active Open Source committer. Tim contributes regularly to Bndtools and is a PMC member in the Apache Aries project.

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Jigsaw: What the Heck Happens Now?

Neil Bartlett | 12:00-12:35 – 25/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

By the time you see this talk, Java 9 should have been released with its flagship feature: the Java Platform Module System (JPMS), also known as Jigsaw.

It goes without saying that Jigsaw will have a big impact on the entire Java ecosystem, and particularly on OSGi developers who have an 18 year head start on modularising Java applications. However, while OSGi and Jigsaw ostensibly solve similar problems, they do so in very different ways. In this talk I will address questions such as…

•Does JPMS make OSGi obsolete?

•How can OSGi and JPMS work together?

•Will OSGi change to take advantage of JPMS features?

•What will the future look like for OSGi and Java?

Speaker Bio:

Neil Bartlett is a principal engineer, consultant, trainer and developer with Paremus. Neil has been working with Java since 1998 and OSGi since 2003 and specialises in Java, OSGi and Eclipse. He is the founder of the Bndtools eclipse plugin project, the leading IDE for OSGi. He can often be found on twitter (@nbartlett) tweeting on all things #OSGi and answering questions on Stack Overflow where he is the only holder of a gold OSGi badge. Neil regularly contributes to the Paremus Blogs and is also writing his second book “Effective OSGi” which will show developers how to quickly accelerate their productivity with OSGi using the latest techniques and tools.

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Reactive streams and components on OSGi

Christian Schneider [Adobe ] | 12:00-12:35 – 25/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Reactive frameworks allow to implement non blocking asynchronous processing in a convenient way. This talk explores how to apply reactive patterns to typical use cases on OSGi like REST services, MQTT Message processing, computations over sliding windows.

We combine messaging and reactor.io streams like also used in Spring 5 to create services that are highly scalable while not tying the user to the technologies being used.

The presented reactive components framework allows to abstract from the messaging technologies using OSGi services. These offer standard  Publishers and Subscribers that work nicely with any reactive framework based on the reactive streams API.

This allows to create integrations like with Apache Camel but in a much leaner and OSGi compliant way.

Speaker Bios:

Christian is an Open Source Architect at Talend who works full time at Apache Software Foundation projects (Karaf, Aries, CXF, Camel). He was the responsible architect for the Services Oriented Architecture of EnBW Trading GmbH (Trading floor of one of Germany’s largest utility companies). He specializes in OSGi and practical integration solutions and is a regular speaker at several Java conferences.

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Fantastic Java contracts – and where to define them?

Milen Dyankov [Liferay] | 14:00-14:35 – 25/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Beginner

Creating objects in Java using `new` keyword was a no brainer for many years! Then IoC / DI questioned the approach and component containers changed the way we think about it!

Managing dependencies between artifacts is yet another topic we still tend to think we have sorted out. Maven central has become the de facto standard artifact repository. Yet it’s far from perfect as it is still developer’s responsibility to know and configure proper dependencies. This easily becomes nightmare with transitive and provided dependencies. So may be it’s time to challenge that approach too? What if we move from hardcoded artifacts to artifact discovery based on well defined contracts?

This talk will demonstrate how that can be done today using OSGi Requirements and Capabilities specification in combination with existing Maven plugins. It will present a PoC for Maven extension that makes it very easy to discover artifacts and assemble applications (both standalone and deployed in containers). It will also point out the issues and draft a potential roadmap to fully automated, contract based dependency management!

Speaker Bio:

Milen is a Developer Advocate at Liferay and focuses on Java and OSGi Platform. He is passionate about designing and building software as well as helping others design and build good software! While still coding he currently spends most of his time teaching, speaking at conferences all over the world and researching his favorite topics around Java modularity and software architecture. For over 15 years in the industry he has developed, designed or consulted on various Java EE solutions for leading European companies (mostly in the finance and telecommunications industry).

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Let data flow, like an endless river into your OSGi application

Mark Hoffmann [Data in Motion Consulting GmbH] | 14:00-14:35 – 25/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Data can be like water flowing along the river. Its a stream never ends.

Especially the many IoT devices can produce such endless flow of data, pushing it using various asynchonous messaging protocols like e.g. MQTT, Websockets, JMS, STOMP, XMPP or whatever you imagine. The OSGi frameowrk provides a lot of stuff to get such streams handled!

This track will give you a clue, how to get these data stream into your application. We show you an overview how to stream data using different protocol implementations like e.g. Websocket or MQTT using one common interface in an OSGi manner. Pushstreams play an imporant role to consume all the data. You will see the new OSGi pushstreams in action and how the consumer can control the speed of flow.

Speaker Bio:

Mark Hoffmann is CTO at Data In Motion Consulting GmbH, Germany

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Constructor injection and other new features for Declarative Services 1.4

BJ Hargrave [IBM] | 14:45-15:20 – 25/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Declarative Services is the best way to provide and consume OSGi services when writing bundles. The OSGi Alliance continues to improve this key specification with new features making it better and more simple to use. For the R7 release, Declarative Services (DS) 1.4 will add constructor injection to the existing method and field injection support. Component property types can now be used to annotate components to set component property values in a type-safe manner. Learn about these and other new features in DS 1.4 to see how OSGi services are easy to use!

Speaker Bio:

BJ Hargrave is a Senior Technical Staff Member in the IBM Cloud organization. He led the development of OSGi technology since its inception and is currently CTO of the OSGi Alliance and chair of the OSGi Core Platform Expert Group. He is also a committer on the Eclipse Equinox project and the Bndtools project.

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OSGi to boost open innovation for smarter cities

Levent Gurgen [CEA] | 14:45-15:20 – 25/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Smart cities need open platforms and tools to help their local ecosystem to exploit available data from various sources such as IoT devices, legacy devices, social networks, mobile applications, etc. and build innovative applications improving the quality of life and security of their citizens.

OSGi, with its modular and service-oriented approach, is an excellent opportunity to boost open innovation for tomorrow’s smart cities.

The talk will illustrate the benefits of OSGi for smart cities with concrete deployed examples in smart city domain in Europe and Japan via the collaborative projects such as BigClouT (http://bigclout.eu) and FESTIVAL (www.festival-project.eu). It will also introduce a global alliance initiative, Urban Technology Alliance, aiming at joining forces with the OSGi community. The main goal of the alliance is to bring together various actors of the smart city ecosystem such as cities, large and small industries, research centers and universities, non-profit organizations, etc. to have the voice of each stakeholder (both supply and demand sides) for defining cities of the future and enabling cooperation and exchange of best practices.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Levent GURGEN is R&D project manager in CEA-LETI and currently coordinating 2 European-Japanese collaborative projects on Internet of Things and Smart Cities, namely BigClouT and FESTIVAL. He was also the technical coordinator of the BUTLER project, a large scale European project whose main goal was to develop a horizontal IoT platform where context aware IoT applications from different verticals can be plugged in. Levent obtained his PhD degree in computer science from the Grenoble Institute of Technology in 2007. His main research interests include sensor data processing and service-oriented platforms for Internet of Things.

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OSGi R7 microservices never looks simpler

Tim Ward [Paremus] | 15:45-16:20 – 25/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

REST microservices are a powerful tool for composing large-scale systems, and now, with the new features of OSGi R7, it has never been simpler to create a modular microservice. Combining the new features in Declarative Services, the JAX-RS Whiteboard, Transaction Control and PushStreams we can create a simple, transactional, persistent, streaming microservice with a minimum of code and a maximum of function.

This talk will use practical code examples to show how new OSGi R7 features can save you time and effort when building microservices, letting you focus on business logic, not boilerplate.

Over the last decade there has been a significant shift in the way that many computer programs are written. The focus has changed from building larger, more monolithic applications that provide a single high-level function, to composing these high-level behaviours from groups of smaller, distributed services. This is generally known as a “microservice” architecture, indicating that the services are smaller and lighter weight than typical web services. With the new features in Release 7 OSGi is a better platform for building your microservices than ever before.

The Declarative Services specification is the ultimate in OSGi injection containers. It supports simple, flexible dependency injection using OSGi services; automatic lifecycle management based upon the availability of configuration and dependencies; and a concise, type-safe set of annotations to define your components. The latest round of Declarative Services updates includes new support for constructor injection, activation fields, and a host of other usability improvements designed to make your components even leaner.

The standard for REST microservices in Java is known as JAX-RS. JAX-RS provides a simple annotation-based model in which POJOs can have their methods mapped to RESTful service invocations. Ideal JAX-RS resources share many features with OSGi services, in that they provide a way for machines (or processes within a machine) to interact with one another through a defined contract. This synergy between JAX-RS resources and OSGi services is the driver for the OSGi JAX-RS whiteboard service, allowing OSGi services to be transparently exposed using JAX-RS.

Transaction management is a delicate balance between trying to take away error-prone boilerplate without replacing it entirely with magic. The problem with relying on magic is that the resulting system ends up being more complex to understand, not less. OSGi Transaction Control uses Java’s new functional APIs to simplify and minimise transaction management code, providing generic resource and transaction management in a concise, type-safe way.

OSGi Push Streams are a powerful new take on asynchronous event processing pipelines based on the Java Stream API. They allow you to compose asynchronous, reactive data transformation and aggregation pipelines in using a familiar easy to read API, while retaining the high throughput and control associated with streaming systems.

 

Speaker Bio:

Tim Ward is CTO at Paremus Ltd, a co-author of Enterprise OSGi in Action, and has been actively working with OSGi for over seven years. Tim has been a regular participant in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups, and is interim chair of the OSGi IoT Expert Group. Tim has led development of several specifications within OSGi. Tim is also an active Open Source committer. Tim contributes regularly to Bndtools and is a PMC member in the Apache Aries project.

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An OSGi based platform supporting Industry 4.0 applications for SMEs

Harald Kornmayer [DHBW Mannheim] | 15:45-16:20 – 25/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Building a worldwide IoT infrastructure requires a reliable basic runtime platform. Such a distributed computing system will consist of Cloud computing instances, sensor node, desktop computers and wearables.

This talk explores how DHBW Mannheim, Germany have created the AQUASI research project (an Automated Quality Assurance Application Platform for SMEs in Handcraft Industries) and discusses the real world results and benefits that have been achieved from the exemplary use case of a german SME company, Rombach NUR-HOLZ which have been participating in the project.

This applied research offers an Open Source framework to enable SME companies to build Industry 4.0 application to monitor and assure Quality Assurance across the full product lifecycle form production through the ongoing maintenance after purchase and installation.

The AQUASI framework leaverages OSGi technology and Eclipse projects. Examples include Jetty, JAX-RS connectors with OSGI and Eclipse p2 and e4. . The project started with the development of an Industry 4.0 language using the AQUASI data and communication model to enable faster development of the SME applications.

The talk will include an overview of the project architecture of the AQUASI system including the REST-based communication model that is used, along with UI components and future plans.  Attendees will also get to understand some of the project challenges that have been faced and overcome.

Speaker Bio:

Harald is a Professor at DHBW Mannheim

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CDI and OSGi: So happy together!

Raymond Auge [Liferay, Inc.] | 16:30-17:05 – 25/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

CDI is a cornerstone of JavaEE development. The OSGi Alliance’s Enterprise Expert Group has undertaken to develop a specification for how CDI should interact with the OSGi framework and service registry. This talk will review the current progress of this specification and try to lightly demonstrate it’s utility.

Speaker Bio:

Ray Augé is a Senior Software Architect focused on feature development and innovation. Since joining Liferay in 2005, his goal has been to increase ease of development without compromising creativity. Recently, he has spearheaded the modularization of the Liferay platform. He represents Liferay on the OSGi Alliance Board of Directors. He also participates in a variety of Open Source projects focused on modularity, and is helping to architect the next generation of Liferay technologies. Raymond holds a B.S. in Computer Science from Laurentian University.

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When whiteboards play together. JAX-RS and Servlets the OSGi way

Mark Hoffmann, Jürgen Albert [Data in Motion Consulting Gmbh] | 16:30-17:05 – 25/10/2017 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

OSGi provides specifications for HTTP whiteboards as well as JAX-RS whiteboards. This talk will give you an real world insight of how these specifications can work together.

Are you familiar with the the problem when you quickly need a site setup consisting of whiteboard services such as static web resources, servlets and REST services for integration testing or a customer review?

So we got Jetty and Jersey in the team, they provide sample implementations for both of the specifications.

We will show you how easy it is to dynamically compose such setups running isolated from other sites. You will even get an idea of how to quickly compose your configuration from existing whiteboard services, serving your needs.  Perhaps you need more of these setups at the same time, on the same framework? No problem, as you will see…… Let us show you how you can take advantage of all of the flexibility that OSGi whiteboards can offer.

Speaker Bios:

Mark Hoffmann

Mark is CTO at Data In Motion Consulting GmbH, Germany

Jürgen Albert

Jurgen is CEO at Data In Motion Consulting GmbH, Germany

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Why and How We are Building the Universal Software Knowledge Base

Roberto Di Cosmo [INRIA/Software Heritage] | 09:00-09:45 – 26/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Keynote

Software is at the heart of our digital society and embodies a growing part of our scientific, technical and organisational knowledge, to the point that we can say it is now part of our cultural heritage. The Software Heritage project’s stated mission is to ensure that this precious body of knowledge will be preserved over time and made available to all.

We do this for multiple reasons. To preserve the scientific and technological knowledge embedded in software source code, that is a precious part of our heritage. To allow better software development and reuse for society and industry, by building the largest and open software knowledge database, enabling the development of a broad range of value added applications. To foster better science, by assembling the largest curated archive for software research, and building the infrastructure for preserving and sharing research software.

We do this now, because we are at a turning point: on one side, the founding fathers of computer technology are still around, and willing to contribute their knowledge, but only for a limited time. On the other, we seem to be at increasing risk of massive lossage of source code developed by the Free and Open Source community, in particulare due to code hosting sites that shut down when their popularity decreases.

The ambitious goal of the Software Heritage project is to address these risks, by collecting, preserving, and sharing all  available software in source code form. Together with its complete development history. Forever.

We have already archived more than 3 billion unique source code files and 700 million unique commits, spanning more than 60 million projects from major software development hubs, GNU/Linux distributions, and upstream software collections.

This great start shows that we can succeed in the long run, if all stakeholders, from individuals to companies, from public to private entities, contribute actively to this mission.

We strongly believe in openness, transparency and collaboration: that’s why Software Heritage is developed transparently as a collaborative project and all its own source code is available as free and open source software under copyleft licenses. Currently Software Heritage is incubated by Inria, with a clear plan to become soon an independent charitable, nonprofit organization.

 

Speaker Bio:

Roberto is Director at INRIA / Software Heritage, France

PhD in Computer Science from the University of Pisa, former associate professor at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, now full professor at University Paris Diderot since 1999. Currently on leave at Inria as director of the Software Heritage initiative, that aims to build the universal archive of all the source code publicly available. Research interests: functional, parallel and distributed programming, type systems, rewriting, linear logic, new scientific problems posed by the advent of Free Software, like package management and static analysis of large software collections.

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Smart IoT on OSGi with Apache OpenWhisk

David Bosschaert, Carsten Ziegeler [Adobe] | 10:15-10:50 – 26/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Beginner

IoT solutions are becoming more and more common in the market and new devices and gadgets are showing up on a daily basis. Additionally, the networks and protocols used by the devices can be highly specialized for use cases such as minimal energy consumption or for long range connectivity. If you want your IoT system to be future proof while being able to take advantage of new technologies without having to change your system every time, then the OSGi Device Abstraction Layer can help. It provides IoT APIs independent of the underlying technology. In this talk Carsten and David will look at integrating IoT systems through OSGi with serverless backend systems such as Apache OpenWhisk to combine IoT with smart decisions or controls initiated by a cloud based functional architecture. It will include a demo with IoT sensors that communicate with Apache Felix on a Raspberry Pi connected to a serverless backend for additional processing and orchestration.

Speaker Bios:

David Bosschaert

David Bosschaert works for Adobe Research and Development. He spends the much of his time on technology relating to OSGi in Apache and other open source projects. He is also co-chair of the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group and an active participant in the OSGi Cloud efforts.

Before joining Adobe, David worked for Red Hat/JBoss and IONA Technologies in Dublin, Ireland.

Carsten Ziegeler

Carsten Ziegeler is working at Adobe Research Switzerland and spends most of his time on architectural and infrastructure topics. Working for over 25 years in open source projects, Carsten is a member of the Apache Software Foundation and heavily participates in several Apache communities including Sling, Felix and ACE. He is a frequent speaker on technology and open source conferences. Carsten participates in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups and is a member of the OSGi Alliance board.

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Data Analytics with OSGi – Experience, Challenges, Solutions

Alexander Stark [Bosch Software Innovations GmbH] | 11:00-11:35 – 26/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Augmenting connectivity and device management with certain data analytics features helps you to bring your IoT projects to the next level. In principle, there are two major integration paths: (1) Get the data from the devices (i.e. the edges), transfer it to a backend, and run analytics jobs on top. (2) Run simple analytics jobs e.g. on the edges and transfer only the results to (device managing systems in) the backend. In the past months, we have explored these options by integrating some of the Bosch IoT Analytics functionalities with the ProSyst stack. In a first step, we have read data (i.e. OSGi messages) coming from specific gateways and managed by ProSyst’s mPRM. We experienced that in this set-up OSGi messages are not out-of-the-box usable in analytics, hence, several transformation steps are necessary, e.g. if values coming as separate OSGi events, like motion with x, y, z, they need to be recombined as a vector including deduced values like root mean square. The data was subsequently used in anomaly detection jobs implemented with the respective Bosch IoT Analytics cloud service. This analytics cloud service helps you analyze a set of devices and identify the individual anomalous ones, i.e. those sending implausible data or just behaving strange. By deploying the thus trained anomaly detection algorithms on edge devices and thus reducing the noise in the backend, the two above mentioned paths are covered and the roundtrip is complete. In this talk, we describe our experiments and show some challenges we met as well as possible solutions.

Speaker Bio:

Coming soon.

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Eclipse MicroProfile Config and OSGi Config Admin

Emily Jiang [IBM] | 13:00-13:35 – 26/10/2017 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Eclipse MicroProfile Config defines a Java programming model for microservices. It offers the capability of configuring microservices without repacking the microservices; microservices reacting differently based on the deployment environment; dynamic configuration feeding into the microservices without restarting the microservices. OSGi Config Admin exists for many years and offers an efficient configuration model to OSGi applications. MicroPorfile Config can work well in OSGi applications. It doesn’t contradict but instead compliments Config Admin. Come to this session to find out the common and different features between the two technologies, as well as the possibility of integrating Eclipse MicroProfile Config to OSGi applications.

Speaker Bio:

Emily Jiang is CDI Lead for WebSphere Application Server and works for IBM. Based at IBM’s Hursley laboratory in the UK, she has worked on WebSphere Application Server since 2006 and contributed both on OSGi application support and CDI integration of WebSphere Application Server releases. She is an active member of OSGi Enterprise Expert Group and currently is working on standardising CDI Integration Specification. Emily also participates in open source projects. She is a PMC member of the Apache Aries project.

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