2016 Community Event Speaker Abstracts and Bios

Building Nano Services with OSGi Declarative Services

Dirk Fauth [Robert Bosch GmbH] & Peter Kirschner [Kirschners GmbH] | 09:00-12:00 – 25/10/2016 | Tutorial – Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

OSGi declarative services exist for a long time and are used to implement a modular service-oriented architecture. Because of the supported dynamics, the easy way to define, register and consume services, declarative services can be found in various scenarios. Using several of the long time existing specifications like Declarative Service, ConfigurationAdmin and Remote Service Admin, it is also easy to setup the currently hyped micro services by using OSGi declarative services.

In this session we will give an introduction to declarative services in general and create some services in our favourite IDE. We will create and use them in combination with DS annotations. As Eclipse PDE supports DS annotations out of the box since Neon, we will prepare the tutorial in a way that both Eclipse RCP and plain OSGi developers can benefit. So every step of the tutorial will be shown in PDE and Bndtools in parallel. The main focus of the tutorial is to get started with declarative services. The tooling at this part shouldn’t be the limiting factor.

I published a Getting Started Tutorial that covers in general the contents of this session. This can be found here.

But we we also plan to extend that with examples on configuration and debugging, to have a good overview of the capabilities.

Speaker Bios:

Dirk Fauth

Dirk Fauth is a Software Architect for Rich Client Systems working for the Robert Bosch GmbH in Stuttgart and a lecturer in Java basics for the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University (DHBW). He is active in developing, teaching and talking about Eclipse RCP applications and Eclipse related technologies. He is project lead of the Nebula NatTable project, Eclipse Platform committer and also a committer and contributor to several other Eclipse projects. He is also blogging about NatTable, Eclipse and OSGi on http://blog.vogella.com/author/fipro/ and https://blog.codecentric.de/en/author/dirk-fauth/

Peter Kirschner

Peter is CEO at Kirschners GmbH, Germany

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The Shuttle Case

Stephen Carver [Cranfield University] | 13:00-13:45 – 25/10/2016 | Keynote

Abstract:
EclipseCon Europe Keynote

Experience level: Beginner

January 28, 1986: The space shuttle Challenger explodes just one minute after launch. As the world looked on horrified, few realized that this was an inevitable accident that had been predicted by the designers for years. Indeed, the day before the key engineers believed that there was “essentially a 100% probability of disaster.”

After the accident, NASA embarked upon major management reforms. Sadly, the reforms made the launches look almost too safe, and as a result over the subsequent years standards and relationships slipped once more.

Then in February 2003, the space shuttle Columbia burned up on re-entry and the entire crew perished. The chilling fact was that this was a management repeat of the Challenger disaster – NASA had not truly learned the lessons of the past.

In talking about the Shuttle Case, Stephen Carver will address these key issues: the importance of real communication, leadership of complex and strategic change, risk management, personal responsibility, keeping organizational learning alive, and the dangers of silo thinking.

Speaker Bio:

Stephen Carver is a Senior Lecturer, Cranfield School of Management at Cranfield University. Stephen is an unusual blend of academic, businessman, and teller of tales. He is known for taking complex management concepts and distilling them down into highly informative and fast-paced presentations. Although currently an academic, he has spent most of his working life in real business, and runs his own successful project management company.

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DIANNE: A distributed deep learning framework on OSGi

Tim Verbelen | 14:00-14:35 – 25/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Beginner.

With the current explosion of IoT devices connected to the Internet, the biggest challenge in the near future is how to process and analyze all this generated data, making use of the highly distributed compute infrastructure at hand. A promising approach for data analysis is deep learning, using brain-inspired neural networks for feature extraction and detection. In our research lab, we have developed DIANNE, an OSGi-based framework for creating, deploying and training artificial neural networks in a modular way. Benefiting from OSGi modularity, we can easily distribute (parts of) the neural networks among cloud and edge devices.

Speaker Bio:

Tim Verbelen received his M.Sc. degree in Computer Science from Ghent University, Belgium, in June 2009. In July 2013, he received his Ph.D. degree with his dissertation “Adaptive Offloading and Configuration of Resource Intensive Mobile Applications.” Since August 2009, he has been working at the Department of Information Technology (INTEC) of the Faculty of Engineering at Ghent University, and is now active as postdoctoral researcher. His main research interests include mobile cloud computing and adaptive software. Specifically he is researching adaptive strategies to enhance real-time applications such as Augmented Reality on mobile devices.

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OSGi toolchain from the ground up

Matteo Rulli [FlairBit] | 14:00-14:35 – 25/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

OSGi learning curve is steep but its benefits widely surpass difficulties: OSGi gives you sensible dependencies management, pluggable extensions mechanisms, strong modularity, out-of-the-box semantic versioning support and strong contract-based software development.

In this talk I’ll describe how to build an effective OSGi toolchain from the ground up: integrate maven and bndtools, set-up a test-driven development workflow on top of OSGi, use maven repositories as a baseline for semantic versioning and leverage bnd remote launcher to effectively debug bundles on remote target runtimes.

Speaker Bio:

Matteo Rulli is the founder of FlairBit, a company focused on delivering data-centric, scalable, end-to-end solutions for the Industrial Internet of Things. Matteo has been working with OSGi since 2009 and he adopted this fantastic technology as the mainstay for all FlairBit backend developments and services. Before starting-up FlairBit, Matteo had the chance of to ride the IoT wave from the very beginning and led the development of many successful IoT projects and solutions.

FlairBit delivers end-to-end Internet of Things (IoT) solutions, providing tools and services to quickly integrate online data processing, Big-Data and Analytics into a flexible and modular IoT technology stack. FlairBit data centric solutions are the crossroad between powerful analytics tools and customer’s operational data streams unlocking the value of IoT data.

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New and cool in OSGi R7

Carsten Ziegeler [Adobe] & David Bosschaert [Adobe] | 14:45-15:20 – 25/10/2016 |Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Beginner.

The OSGi expert groups are working on the next big release. Learn in this session about the various new specification efforts going on and how they will make your developer life easier. The new specifications range from configuration handling, object conversion, JAX-RS, distributed eventing, to cloud and IoT.

Speaker Bio:

Carsten Ziegeler

Carsten Ziegeler is working at Adobe Research Switzerland and spends most of his time on architectural and infrastructure topics. Working for over 25 years in open source projects, Carsten is a member of the Apache Software Foundation and heavily participates in several Apache communities including Sling, Felix and ACE. He is a frequent speaker on technology and open source conferences. Carsten participates in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups and is a member of the OSGi Alliance board.

David Bosschaert

David Bosschaert works for Adobe Research and Development. He spends the much of his time on technology relating to OSGi in Apache and other open source projects. He is also co-chair of the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group and an active participant in the OSGi Cloud efforts.

Before joining Adobe, David worked for Red Hat/JBoss and IONA Technologies in Dublin, Ireland.

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Eclipse + Maven + OSGi has never been so easy

Attila Kiss [Everit Kft.] | 14:45-15:20 – 25/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

This talk outlines the ease of use of OSGi in application code and shows how to master development tasks by using the right APIs and tools. Learn about the latest in component development, asynchronous processing, configuration management and deploying your application code in larger modules, so-called subsystems. A subsystem allows to package a set of bundles and configurations. The subsystem can run isolated from other bundles or other applications.

Learn how to leverage the latest OSGi tech for your own projects. All of the functionality discussed is available as open source.

Speaker Bios:

Attila Kiss is one of the lead developers at Everit. At the beginning of his carrier he used Java EE and Spring as everybody. As time passed, he was disappointed on these monolitchic technologies. OSGi gave him the answer to how to design an application with long-term maintainability.

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Aspecio: aspect-oriented programming meets the OSGi service model

Simon Chemouil [Lambdacube] | 15:45-16:20 – 25/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:

Experience level: Intermediate.

Aspect-oriented programming is a paradigm meant to provide “horizontal” modularity: by encapsulating cross-cutting concerns such as access control or performance metrics away from business logic, it was supposed to be a new tool for developers that would not only prevent copy-paste and guard methods, but allow to stack semantic models on top of single-concern implementations.

The early excitement somewhat faded when the freedom provided by rich aspect languages proved to make understanding of code and its debugging harder because of scattered logic and altered bytecode. Today in the Java world, it is used mostly in a lighter form in the Spring framework, but it has traditionally been difficult to integrate properly with OSGi.

When OSGi R5 introduced the ServiceHook API, one of its promises was to enable OSGi-powered implementations of aspect frameworks. Aspecio[1] is such a framework, taking an opinionated approach to aspects to make them predictable while giving a lot of control to developers and keeping the overhead minimal:

  • Fully OSGi-compliant: Interceptors are services, dynamism is fully supported ;
  • Define your aspects in plain Java ;
  • Works with any OSGi component framework, such as Declarative Services, Blueprint, or plain OSGi core APIs ;
  • Minimal overhead: on-demand bytecode generation, no primitive boxing or Method#invoke, and a “pay only for what you use” approach through a Java 8 mixin-like advice definition API ;
  • Reasonably easy to debug: no change to existing bytecode, generated proxies are very thin and expose a well-documented behavior.
  • The OSGi service model is so versatile that aspects could feel useless at first glance; it turns out they are a handy and complementary tool in OSGi application design.

In this talk, I will present Aspecio and what we can accomplish by mixing the OSGi service model with aspects, and demonstrate how anyone can add aspects to any OSGi application in a few minutes without refactoring existing code.

[1] http://lambdacube.github.io/aspecio

Speaker Bio:

Simon works as a software architect and builds distributed systems. On a never-ending quest to build robust software, he focuses on modeling (a.k.a solving the right problem), correctness, performance and maintainability. Modular thinking and design is a necessary approach to succeed in meeting these goals, and OSGi is the way to make it happen in Java ; that’s what Simon has been doing for the better part of the last decade. Other interests include data science and machine learning, language theory and formal specifications, cryptocurrencies, and new computing models.

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It’s Beautiful enRoute

Paul Fraser [A2Z Living Pty. Ltd.] | 15:45-16:20 – 25/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner.

This talk will explain to java developers not yet using OSGi, how they can produce output with little knowledge of the underlying technology.
A helicopter view of the OSGi enRoute methodology will be explained with a demonstration of the simplicity of bringing non OSGi code into the brilliant enRoute environment.
The src from ImageJ, a non OSGi image processing codebase, will be brought into an enRoute setup consisting of an API bundle, a provider bundle and a command bundle.
The purpose of the command bundle is to tryout and debug the services exposed in the api. The ease of use of the command bundle will be demonstrated.
A developer having experienced a quick result using enRoute will be more relaxed and enthusiastic when learning the nitty gritty of the underlying tools and methods used when working with OSGi.
With this top down approach to using OSGi, developers will understand why they should be using OSGi and OSGi enRoute.

Speaker Bio:

Paul gained a Fellowship Diploma in Communications Engineering (FRMIT) from the Royal Melbourne Institute Of Technology in the days of the vacuum tube and the introduction of the transistor. During the 70’s he developed a keen interest in computing and built and programmed single board computers using the ASR33 with paper tape. 40 years spent developing software for internal use in his family’s modular furniture manufacturing business sparked his love of simplicity and modular techniques. The statement “Once data is entered on the internet it should not need to be typed in again” is an area in which he hopes to make a difference. He is currently developing a secure P2P network designed to take a lot of complexity and frustration out of using the net especially for the young and the aged. Because of his long history of hands on business management and processes he likes to use tools that reduce development friction and enable things to actually get done. Eclipse, OSGi, Bndtools and Vaadin are the tools he has settled on for his software development work.

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OSGi for outsiders

Milen Dyankov [Liferay] | 16:30-17:05 – 25/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

OSGi has evolved and matured beyond recognition over the last few years. It’s now easier than ever before, to build dynamic, modular Java applications to address the challenges imposed by ever growing and constantly changing business requirements. Despite that fact, OSGi seems to be far from receiving the appreciation it deserves. And if you are OSGi developer who now wanders “why should I care?”, let me remind you Thomas Edison’s famous quote “The value of an idea lies in the using of it”!

Growing large community around given technology has proven to be an essential part of its success. In this talk I’d like to go over what OSGi community is (not) doing to attract “outsiders”. I’d also argue it can do much better than that. Based on observations and conversation from the last 2 years trying to advocate for OSGi among Java developers. I’ll try to position the technology it today’s reality of microservices, containers, clouds, DevOps, automation, Java 9, … and bring to your attention the perspective of an “outsider” together with all the presumptions, fallacies and promises it comes with. Finally I’d like to share some ideas about how to address those, promote relevant parts of OSGi and thus perhaps make it more attractive to Java developers!

Speaker Bios:

Milen is a Developer Advocate at Liferay and focuses on Java and OSGi Platform. He is passionate about designing and building software as well as helping others design and build good software! While still coding he currently spends most of his time teaching, speaking at conferences all over the world and researching his favorite topics around Java modularity and software architecture. For over 15 years in the industry he has developed, designed or consulted on various Java EE solutions for leading European companies (mostly in the finance and telecommunications industry).

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Taming Startup Dynamics

Magnus Jungsbluth [Bundesdruckerei GmbH] & Domagoj Cosic [Bundesdruckerei GmbH] | 16:30-17:05 – 25/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

If you had to name a single great thing about OSGi, it would probably be its dynamics. Services come and go; other services react to those events, configuration can change and so on. Even the startup is dynamic: start levels are increased synchronously; however, configuration, Declarative Services, and Blueprint are started asynchronously after bundles turn active. We love that but sometimes you want to exercise control over when your application is actually fully started or more importantly when it is not. You certainly do not want your system to be accessible with a security module that threw an exception during startup. Unlike monolithic applications, an OSGi application behaves more like a distributed system that converges to a final state eventually.

We will show you a way to monitor startup of your application by creatively using some common OSGi mechanisms and demonstrate failure scenarios for common subsystems like configuration and Blueprint. We will also demonstrate the concept of start phases which are a higher-level concept on top of OSGi start levels. A phased start enables a higher level of security in the face of failures during startup.

The source code for the APIs and the reference implementation are available under Apache 2.0 license

Speaker Bios:

Magnus Jungsbluth

Magnus Jungsbluth has been working at Bundesdruckerei GmbH since 2011 where he is currently heading the software platform development based on OSGi. Having mainly done Java (Enterprise) development for the last years, he came to love OSGi and the modularity it enables if done right.

Domagoj Cosic

Senior Software Architect at Bundesdruckerei GmbH, Germany

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OSGi/Java in Industrial IoT: More than a Solid Trend — Essential to Scale into the World of Internet-Connected Things

Robert Andres [Eurotech] & Walter Hofmann [Hitachi High Technologies] | 09:00-09:45 – 26/10/2016 | Keynote

Abstract:
OSGi Community Event Keynote.

Experience level: Beginner

With the promise of “real” IoT, the requirements for computational capabilities and agility at the edge demand IT-centric architectures and solutions that are based on open and industry standards. “IoT stacks” that are built on OSGi and Java’s solid foundation ensure effective modular software development and management on abstracted hardware.

Total cost of ownership in these IoT solutions matters a lot more than the simple combined hardware and software cost per edge node. Sophisticated software elements – including business intelligence tools, databases, and analytics packages – leverage data remotely and centrally to achieve the best results for customers. A perfect example of an analytics solution using such an approach is the predictive maintenance solution that Hitachi offers, leveraging Eurotech’s IoT hardware and software building blocks that heavily rely on OSGi.

Speaker Bios:

Robert Andres

Robert Andres (Eurotech) has worked in the IT and Communications industry since 1987. His IT career began at Digital Equipment Corporation in customer service, technical training and data centre operations, where he quickly discovered his passion for networking and distributed systems. Mr. Andres spent several years at 3Com Corporation GmbH in Product Management and as Marketing Director where he was a member of the 3Com Executive Board in charge of Central Europe. In 1997 he became Marketing Director for the Client Access Business Unit in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA). Since 1999 Mr. Andres has supported businesses in marketing, consulting, sales strategies, business development, and training, particularly in the fields of embedded, networking, M2M/IoT, and IT security. From 2010, Mr. Andres has worked as the Chief Marketing Officer for the Eurotech Group, where IoT hardware and software strategy is part of his responsibilities..

Walter Hofmann

Walter Hofmann has been working since 2004 for Hitachi High Technologies as a consultant for Product and Services Innovation and Business Development in Europe. Since 2012, he has been developing predictive maintenance solutions for various global industrial customers. He has an M.Sc. in production engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute. His leadership capability and entrepreneurial skills as well as his sound practical experience in various high-tech and international companies has resulted in many actionable strategies, business models, and successful start-up companies.

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What’s happening in the OSGi IoT Expert Group?

Tim Ward [Paremus] | 10:15-10:50 – 26/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

The Internet of Things is a hot topic in the IT industry, and it shows no sign of cooling down. When OSGi was first conceived its purpose was to do exactly the sorts of things that IoT gateways do right now. In fact a lot of IoT gateways run OSGi today! The OSGi IoT Expert Group exists to help identify new areas where OSGi can offer a better IoT platform, and to define solutions for those use cases.

This talk from the chair of the IoT Expert Group will cover the recent work that’s been going on in the IoT Expert Group, what outputs you can expect to see in the future, and also information about how you can get involved with the Expert Group

Background
The OSGi service platform has existed as a modular micro-service runtime for well over a decade, and it was originally created to run on small embedded systems in the home. It turns out that the same model works very well on servers and in the cloud, making OSGi the perfect platform for end-to-end IoT development.

In the last two years the OSGi Alliance have been on an IoT requirements gathering mission, the result of which has been the new IoT Expert Group. Whether you’re looking for security test suites, low-footprint communications with edge devices, or large-scale data streaming the IoT Expert Group are there to make sure that the experience is as smooth and simple as possible.

Speaker Bio:

Tim Ward is CTO at Paremus Ltd, a co-author of Enterprise OSGi in Action, and has been actively working with OSGi for over seven years. Tim has been a regular participant in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups, and is interim chair of the OSGi IoT Expert Group. Tim has led development of several specifications within OSGi. Tim is also an active Open Source committer. Tim contributes regularly to Bndtools and is a PMC member in the Apache Aries project.

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Microservices & OSGi: Better together?

Graham Charters [IBM] | 10:15-10:50 – 26/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Since the 1960s the industry has been rediscovering the benefits of modularity. Modularity comes in many different guises, from small software objects to deployed systems. Although many approaches to modularity exhibit common characteristics, a number also have unique benefits. This talk will introduce the concepts of modularity, Microservices and OSGi, and compare Microservices and OSGi against a Modularity Maturity Model (a measure of modularity capability and completeness). It will describe how the similarity in characteristics between Microservices and OSGi make these technologies an ideal pairing. Finally, it will cover some of the standard technologies to choose for OSGi technology-based Microservices and new technologies on the horizon.

Speaker Bio:

Graham is a Senior Technical Staff Member in the IBM WebSphere Application Server development organization. He is responsible for the WebSphere Liberty Repository and WebSphere OSGi Applications programming model, and the IBM technical lead in the OSGi Alliance Enterprise Expert Group.

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OSGi on High Speed Trains in Germany

Roland Ndaka Fru [Yaka 5 GmbH] & Dmytro Pishchukhin | 11:00-11:35 – 26/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

We designed, developed, deployed and have been running an OSGi platform on all high-speed ICE trains in Germany since 2014. Requirements, design and development lasted 6 years and the goal of the platform was to integrate multiple existing systems on the train and link them to the back-office systems using GSM-R and GSM-P network. This integration required a modular platform and OSGi offered the ideal technology to achieve this.

The OSGi based solution meant that functionality such as seat reservation could be achieved via the newly integrated wireless network connectivity rather than a manual offline process. This led to reduced cost and improved reliability. Other systems that were integrated included:

  • Timetable & schedule data integration,
  • Restaurant/bistro cash-desk for efficient supply chain management,
  • Train (preemptive) diagnostics for effective maintenance planning,
  • Train (GPS) location for effective fleet management.

The solution uses many of the OSGi specification services including Monitor Admin, Event Admin, Configuration Admin, Wire Admin, and others.

The solution has proved very successful and 2nd and 3rd generation extended platforms are being worked on to include QOS, Microservices, Virtualization. These build on the existing platform and will serve as a reference for future trains.

The presentation will include a number of the lessons learnt and recommendations for other practitioners putting the technology in to use in for a highly visible critical service based solution.

The project of course involved more than just the technology and required the adaption of existing processes within a conservative and long existing environment at Deutsche Bahn.

Speaker Bio:

Roland Ndaka Fru

Roland Ndaka Fru is a Dipl. Ing. in Information & Communication Technology from the Fachhochschule in Dortmund, Germany. He later acquired an MBA qualification in Business and Engineering from the Steinbeiss/Kelly Business school. Roland first came in contact with Java technologies in 1998 while working as a student for Siemens AG and developing call center solutions based on IBM IVR (Interactive Voice Response) Java Beans. He became a Sun (today Oracle) Certified Java Programmer 2 years later and has since then worked on designing & developing solutions and business models driven by Java. He has had different roles from Project manager, Requirements manager, Scrum Master, Architect & Developer over the last 15 years. He also contributed to open source projects like eclipse whenever possible. Roland has been a freelance consultant for the last 12 years and worked on solutions for Clients like Siemens AG, 1&1 AG, Deutsche Bahn amongst others. He has employed OSGi technologies since his early days as a consultant in building solutions that cover a broad spectrum from embedded to enterprise and from stanalone, thin clients to multi-tier architectures. He is currently Founder and Managing Director of Yaka 5 GmbH in Cologne, Germany. Roland loves spending time with his daughters and designing homes as a passion when taking a break from technology to do something meaningful 😉

Dmytro Pishchukhin

Dmytro is an independent Java/OSGi consulter. He is a committer of OPS4j and KnowHowLab communities.

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Lean Microservices with OSGi

Christian Schneider | 11:00-11:35 – 26/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Microservices and their frameworks like spring boot allow to start fast but can easily produce ugly monoliths or tangled webs of fine grained dependencies. OSGi on the other hand provides great modularity but is regarded as more complex than spring boot and alike. This Talk shows how to create lean and modular microservices using OSGi, maven, bndtools and Apache Karaf. The build result is a runnable jar or docker image and nicely fits microservice deployments. See how OSGi allows the flexibility to deploy each microservice on its own and let them communicate over (REST) remote calls or deploy them together and talk using OSGi services locally using the same business code bundles.

Speaker Bios:

Christian is an Open Source Architect at Talend who works full time at Apache Software Foundation projects (Karaf, Aries, CXF, Camel). He was the responsible architect for the Services Oriented Architecture of EnBW Trading GmbH (Trading floor of one of Germany’s largest utility companies). He specializes in OSGi and practical integration solutions and is a regular speaker at several Java conferences.

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How to build an effective IoT demo with OSGi

Derek Baum [Paremus] & Walt Bowers [Eurotech] | 11:45-12:20 – 26/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Physical IoT devices are more exciting than any software user interface and should be central to any demo. Initially attracted by the IoT device, visitors’ are naturally receptive to learn more about the software platform and/or products controlling the solution.

This is why the OSGi Alliance based their IoT demo on a LEGO® train. OSGi and the OSGi enRoute platform had no existing integrations for Lego® trains, but provided a great base for IoT development. The demo showcases how the OSGi ecosystem of open source and commercial products can be used together to build a compelling IoT solution.

This talk reviews the end to end architecture used to deliver the demo and describes how the custom actuators and sensors needed to operate the LEGO® train were constructed and controlled. It also explains the issues encountered and how they were resolved. It then describes how the demo has been evolved for this conference.

The OSGi IoT demo is on display in the exhibition area. Please visit the demo and try it out for yourself.

Speaker Bio:

Derek Baum

Derek is a software engineer with Paremus and has extensive knowledge of the Java/JVM/Linux stack. Studied Electronic Engineering at university, but has worked solely with software until recent IoT interest caused him to find his old soldering iron.

Walt Bowers

Walt Bowers is a Technical Solutions Architect and technology evangelist focused on the Internet of Things, Java and OSGi. He enjoys engineering solutions to complex problems and has a particular interest in intelligent IoT gateways and edge analytics. He is a committer on the Eclipse Kura IoT project and a member of the OSGi Alliance IoT Expert Group. Walt has been involved with Java since 1996 and has extensive experience in Java , OSGiand IoT in wide range of roles including developer, development manager and product manager. Walt has a BS in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Georgia and over 25 years of experience in software engineering.

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Of microservices and microservices

Robert Munteanu [Adobe Systems Inc] | 11:45-12:20 – 26/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Microservices are definitely the hot topic du jour . Everyone ( and their dog ) is using microservices or migrating towards them. To make things more interesting, the OSGi community has been talking about microservices for 6 years now, so now we have two clashing definitions of the term.

Besides the dreaded monolith and the famed microservices-based architecture there is plenty of room for a middle ground, where an API gateway mediates between a host of microservices and their consumers. Such a gateway solves multiple cross-cutting concerns, such as authentication, API standardisation, logging and decoupling the API evolution. As it turns out, OSGi is an ideal setting for building such an application.

The API gateway implementation demoed is based on Apache Sling – an innovative web framework built on top of the Java Content Repository (JCR), that uses OSGi for its component model and fosters RESTful application design. Although we will use Apache Sling for examples, previous knowledge of Sling or its components is not required.

Speaker Bios:

Working as a Senior Computer Scientist at Adobe, Robert Munteanu is a software developer with a passion for Open Source. He is a frequent contributor to Open Source projects, such as Apache Sling, MantisBT and the Eclipse Plugin for ReviewBoard. Robert is a frequent conference speaker, including Devoxx, ApacheCon and EclipseCon.

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Oh No! Visual Studio Code – Yet Another Development Tool

Dirk Baeumer [Microsoft] | 13:45-15:00 – 26/10/2016 | Keynote

Abstract:
EclipseCon Europe Keynote

Experience level: Beginner

Having spent over twenty years on developer tools, I was convinced that Eclipse was the last development tool I would work on. I was wrong.

It all started five years ago as an experiment to see what is possible when it comes to developing in the browser. Now we have shipped Visual Studio Code, a new smart code editor that is extensible, open source, and runs cross platform. While Code is implemented using web technologies, our goal is to make it indistinguishable from a native editor. It is all implemented in TypeScript on top of the Electron shell Node.js, and uses hundreds of open source components.

It is fascinating to see how many things have changed since my early work on Eclipse. In this talk, I look back on this journey, discuss what we did differently in Code vs. Eclipse, and present an architecture that enables the sharing of language services among Eclipse, Visual Studio Code, and other development tools.

Note: Erich Gamma was the original presenter for this talk, but is unable to attend.

Speaker Bio:

Dirk Baeumer, Principal Software Engineer at Microsoft Switzerland, works on Visual Studio Code and web-based programming editors. He enjoys programming with a strong interest in agile software development as well as de-integrated development environments.

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How the Bosch Group is making use of OSGi for IoT

Kai Hackbarth [Bosch Software Innovations GmbH] | 15:15-15:50 – 26/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

In February 2015 the Bosch Group acquired ProSyst Software as part of its IoT strategy. For Bosch Software Innovations, the Bosch Group’s software and systems house, OSGi offers the right balance between flexibility and hardware cost for IoT gateways. There is currently no other technology for IoT gateways that is both more future-proof and more mature than OSGi. In this presentation we want to give an overview of what has been achieved since then, looking at how the ProSyst’s OSGi technology has been integrated into the comprehensive Bosch IoT Suite as well as the Bosch IoT Cloud. We will also present a number of other IoT initiatives in the Bosch group, including smart home and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) where OSGi is already being used. Additionally we will give an outlook on future activities in IoT including our plans in standardization and open source initiatives.

Speaker Bio:

Kai Hackbarth is an Evangelist at Bosch Software Innovations. He has been deeply involved in the technical standardization activities of the OSGi Alliance for more than 15 years. Kai is a member of the OSGi Alliance Board of Directors and has been co-chair of the OSGi Residential Expert Group since 2008. Kai is coordinating several research project activities in various IoT domains. His key focus areas are smart homes, automotive, and the Internet of Things in general, where he actively supports the current developments and strategic positioning of the product portfolio.

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Dynamically assembled REST microservices using JAX-RS and… microservices?

Neil Bartlett [Paremus] | 15:15-15:50 – 26/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

REST microservices are a powerful tool for composing large-scale systems, and the standalone nature of a microservice helps to avoid it becoming part of a “big ball of mud” application. Given the power and success of microservices as inter-process modules, why stop there? OSGi has offered in-process microservices for nearly two decades, and uses them to great effect in modular applications.

The new OSGi JAX-RS whiteboard service allows dynamic OSGi services to be automatically exported as JAX-RS Resources, Filters or Applications. These “Microservice modules” can be easily shared or moved between frameworks, allowing you to benefit from a microservice structure that goes all the way down.

Background
Over the last decade there has been a significant shift in the way that many computer programs are written. The focus has changed from building larger, more monolithic applications that provide a single high-level function, to composing these high-level behaviours from groups of smaller, distributed services. This is generally known as a “microservice” architecture, indicating that the services are smaller and lighter weight than typical web services.

The standard for REST microservices in Java is known as JAX-RS. JAX-RS provides a simple annotation-based model in which POJOs can have their methods mapped to RESTful service invocations. There is automatic mapping of HTTP parameters, and of the HTTP response, based on the annotations, and the incoming HTTP Headers. JAX-RS also includes support for grouping these POJOs into a single Application artifact. This allows the POJOs to interact with one another, as well as to share configuration and runtime state. When used in JAX-RS these POJOs are known as JAX-RS resources.

Ideal JAX-RS resources are stateless, and are usually instantiated by the container. JAX-RS resources share many features with OSGi services, in that they provide a way for machines (or processes within a machine) to interact with one another through a defined contract. This synergy between JAX-RS resources and OSGi services is the driver for the OSGi JAX-RS whiteboard service, allowing OSGi services to be transparently exposed using JAX-RS.

Speaker Bio:

Neil Bartlett is a principal engineer, consultant, trainer and developer with Paremus. Neil has been working with Java since 1998 and OSGi since 2003 and specialises in Java, OSGi and Eclipse. He is the founder of the Bndtools eclipse plugin project, the leading IDE for OSGi. He can often be found on twitter (@nbartlett) tweeting on all things #OSGi and answering questions on Stack Overflow where he is the only holder of a gold OSGi badge. Neil regularly contributes to the Paremus Blogs and is also writing his second book “Effective OSGi” which will show developers how to quickly accelerate their productivity with OSGi using the latest techniques and tools.

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Scalable Event Processing – Pushing the limits with Push Streams!

Tim Ward [Paremus] | 16:00-16:35 – 26/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Data is being produced everywhere, there are sensors in thousands of homes, metrics collection from your cloud applications, industrial sensors manage the safe provision of water and electricity. The question is, what do we do with all of this data? How do you cope with thousands (or millions) of push-based data events per second?

A crucial part of any of any solution is to have the right primitives. An asynchronous, push-based event processing pipeline is essential. OSGi Push Streams offer the power and simplicity of Java 8 streams, but with the power of asynchronous push-based events. This talk will describe the work happening in OSGi’s Push Streams RFC, using streams and promises to build scalable event processing pipelines.

Background
The OSGi service platform has existed as a modular micro-service runtime for well over a decade, but more recently it has embraced asynchronous programming as a core part of the OSGi toolkit. With the introduction of the Async Service, and OSGi promises it is now easier than ever to build asynchronous applications. The focus so far has been on asynchronous requests, but what about streaming systems, ones that need to process or filter thousands, millions, or billions of events before an answer is reached, or perhaps there is no end to the stream at all!

Processing distributed events is the purpose of the Distributed Eventing RFC being discussed by the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group. As the lead author of the RFC, and the lead of the Asynchronous Service specification, Tim has a detailed understanding of the complexities of Asynchronous programming models. Tim will be able to describe the current prototyping around OSGi’s Asynchronous Streaming model, and how it fits with the other popular asynchronous standards.

Speaker Bio:

Tim Ward is CTO at Paremus Ltd, a co-author of Enterprise OSGi in Action, and has been actively working with OSGi for over seven years. Tim has been a regular participant in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups, and is interim chair of the OSGi IoT Expert Group. Tim has led development of several specifications within OSGi. Tim is also an active Open Source committer. Tim contributes regularly to Bndtools and is a PMC member in the Apache Aries project.

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From JARs to Bundles to Resolutions to Knowledge

Raymond Auge [Liferay, Inc.] | 16:00-16:35 – 26/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Creating a modular system leads to a number of benefits, from technical improvements to organizational improvements. However, at scale modularity can require a significant amount of mental energy. The OSGi model is fundamentally based on the idea of injecting knowledge into individual modules which frameworks use to great effect. But given hundreds or thousands of modules the sheer volumn of information can make reasoning about them difficult. Luckily OSGi defines mechanisms for performing operations to reason over arbitrary number of modules. This talk will review and demonstrate the capabilities of these mechanism.

Github Project
Transcript of talk

Speaker Bios:

Software Engineer at Liferay, Inc., Canada.
Ray Augé is a Senior Software Architect focused on feature development and innovation. Since joining Liferay in 2005, his goal has been to increase ease of development without compromising creativity. Recently, he has spearheaded the modularization of the Liferay platform. He represents Liferay on the OSGi Alliance Board of Directors. He also participates in a variety of Open Source projects focused on modularity, and is helping to architect the next generation of Liferay technologies. Raymond holds a B.S. in Computer Science from Laurentian University.

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OSGi for European and Japanese smart cities – experiences and lessons learnt

Levent Gurgen [CEA] | 17:00-17:35 – 26/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Internet of Things (IoT) is the digital skin of the physical world. It has specific requirements such as dynamicity to self-adapt to the continuously changing physical context. The world is heterogeneous and the objects should interoperate to collaborate, thus interoperability is essential. Openness and short learning curve are other requirements so that innovators (e.g. startups) can rapidly build applications with reduced time-to-market and avoid vendor lock-in. Reuse of software and hardware is also particularly important since billion of devices are expected to be deployed in the coming decades and those devices should be multi-purpose and reusable by applications from different domains and not be specific to a given domain.

OSGi has – since 15 years ago – the answers to those requirements of today’s IoT. Its powerful run-time environment for the dynamicity, its service-oriented approach hiding heterogeneity, its modularity making the reuse extremely simple, and last but not least, its open approach giving the potential to democratize the IoT.

The talk will illustrate the benefits of OSGi for IoT with concrete deployed examples, in particular in smart city domain in Europe and Japan via the collaborative projects such as ClouT and FESTIVAL.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Levent GURGEN is R&D project manager in CEA-LETI and currently coordinating 2 European-Japanese collaborative projects on Internet of Things and Smart Cities, namely BigClouT and FESTIVAL. He was also the technical coordinator of the BUTLER project, a large scale European project whose main goal was to develop a horizontal IoT platform where context aware IoT applications from different verticals can be plugged in. Levent obtained his PhD degree in computer science from the Grenoble Institute of Technology in 2007. His main research interests include sensor data processing and service-oriented platforms for Internet of Things.

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Dockerizing apps for the Deployment Platform of the Month – with OSGi

David Bosschaert [Adobe] & Carsten Ziegeler [Adobe] | 17:00-17:35 – 26/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Docker is enjoying immense popularity today for deployment of nearly any type of app and new platforms that support Docker appear on a regular basis. While supporting Docker natively, many platforms have specific APIs to get them to work. As a dev you don’t want to lock yourself in to any of these. You want to keep the option open to switch to target platforms if the need arises. This talk outlines the OSGi Compute Management Service RFP 179 that abstracts over mechanisms to create and launch container nodes. It shows a system that allows you to swap Docker deployment platforms without the need to change your deployment management code. We’ll also talk about how OSGi Cloud Ecosystems RFC 183 can be used in this context for discovery of services, containers and frameworks.

Speaker Bio:

David Bosschaert

David Bosschaert works for Adobe Research and Development. He spends the much of his time on technology relating to OSGi in Apache and other open source projects. He is also co-chair of the OSGi Enterprise Expert Group and an active participant in the OSGi Cloud efforts.

Before joining Adobe, David worked for Red Hat/JBoss and IONA Technologies in Dublin, Ireland.

Carsten Ziegeler

Carsten Ziegeler is working at Adobe Research Switzerland and spends most of his time on architectural and infrastructure topics. Working for over 25 years in open source projects, Carsten is a member of the Apache Software Foundation and heavily participates in several Apache communities including Sling, Felix and ACE. He is a frequent speaker on technology and open source conferences. Carsten participates in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups and is a member of the OSGi Alliance board.

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Getting to the Next Level with Eclipse Concierge

Jan S. Rellermeyer [IBM Research], Tim Verbelen & Jochen Hiller [Deutsche Telekom AG] | 17:45-18:20 – 26/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Eclipse Concierge provides a clean, small and lightweight implementation of the OSGi core framework specification, specifically tailored to embedded systems and IoT. In this talk, we will cover how to use and deploy the Concierge OSGi framework (e.g. using OSGi enRoute), and discuss many of the new and upcoming features in the Concierge project such as the OSGi REST interface and Cloud Ecosystems reference implementations. We will also present our work in progress on implementing the OSGi R6 core specification level and novel demonstrations that illustrate the advantages of having a lean and streamlined OSGi implementation to deal with deployment and dynamism in IoT applications.

Speaker Bio:

Jan Rellermeyer

Jan is a researcher at IBM Research, United States

Tim Verbelen

Tim Verbelen received his M.Sc. degree in Computer Science from Ghent University, Belgium, in June 2009. In July 2013, he received his Ph.D. degree with his dissertation “Adaptive Offloading and Configuration of Resource Intensive Mobile Applications.” Since August 2009, he has been working at the Department of Information Technology (INTEC) of the Faculty of Engineering at Ghent University, and is now active as postdoctoral researcher. His main research interests include mobile cloud computing and adaptive software. Specifically he is researching adaptive strategies to enhance real-time applications such as Augmented Reality on mobile devices.

Jochen Hiller

Jochen Hiller is working for QIVICON department of Deutsche Telekom, which offers a commercial platform for the Smart Home. He is responsible for the OSGi based software stack running on the QIVICON hardware integrating devices of the Smart Home. He and his team are major contributors to Eclipse SmartHome project. He is also committer of Eclipse Concierge OSGi framework as part of the Eclipse IoT projects. He is a longtime Smalltalk, Java and OSGi developer having fun doing OpenSource and other cool stuff.

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Avoid the chaos – Handling 100+ OSGi Components

Balázs Zsoldos [Everit Kft.] | 17:45-18:20 – 26/10/2016 | Seminarräume 1-3

Abstract:
Experience level: Intermediate

Have you ever felt that your system could collapse like the house of cards? Has it ever happened to you that an OSGi component got unsatisfied and that caused a chain reaction? It can be hard to find the root cause when you see 50+ non-active components. In this talk, we will show, how these issues can be solved quickly so programming can be fun again.

In the first part of the talk we will introduce our component model that is based on the concept of Declarative Services. There are minor changes, the ones that allow us to handle large set of component graphs easily.

In the second part

  • we will play a short game with the audience. One must cause a mistake in a large system while another developer (who did not see the change) must fix it.
  • there will be a demo where we set up a complex Servlet Container with multiple Servlet Contexts, Servlets, and Filters via configuration.

Everit Component Model Specification
ECM Graph Webconsole Plugin screenshot

Speaker Bio:

Balazs Zsoldos is the co-founder of Everit. He is the leader of the development of Everit OpenSource Components. Developing Java-based solutions is not only his job but also his passion. He believes in simplicity. That is why he decided to design and build as many simple, but useful goal-oriented modules as he can. As the base of the stack, he chose OSGi. Balazs does not believe in monolith frameworks. Therefore all of the solutions that were designed by him can be used separately. At the beginning of his career, Balazs was a big fan of JEE and Spring. After a while, he changed his mind and started to try replacing everything with non-magical solutions that do not contain interceptors, weaving, etc.

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Observation of Gravitational Waves from Binary Black Hole Mergers – Dawn of a New Astronomy

Benno Willke [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics] | 09:00-09:45 – 27/10/2016 | Keynote

Abstract:
EclipseCon Europe Keynote.

Experience level: Beginner

For the first time, scientists have directly detected gravitational waves. Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of spacetime as predicted by Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Even though gravitational waves can carry enormous amounts of energy, they cause only tiny effects on earth such that it took 100 years from prediction to detection. The mergers of stellar-mass black holes approximately 1.3 billion years ago were identified as the source of the gravitational waves. This discovery supports Einstein’s theory in the dynamic extreme-gravity regime, demonstrates the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems, and opens up a new observation window to the universe.

In this talk I will give a brief introduction to gravitational waves, their sources, and the effect they cause on earth. I will discuss the measurement principle of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors and the technology that made this observation possible. The second part of the talk concentrates on the detected gravitational waves. The main results of the discovery will be presented and the applied analysis methods will be discussed. I will close with an outlook into the future of gravitational wave astronomy.

Speaker Bio:

Apl. Prof. Dr. Benno Willke received his doctoral degree from the University of Hannover, Germany in the field of plasma physics. As part of the GEO collaboration, he worked on the design and installation of the GEO600 gravitational wave detector. After receiving the Feodor Lynen scholarship from the Alexander von Humboldt foundation, he spent a post-doctoral year in the Ginzton Laboratory at Stanford University doing research for the laser system of the LIGO gravitational wave detector. Back in Germany, he continued to work on GEO600, focusing on the laser system and interferometry. He chaired the lasers working group of the LIGO scientific collaboration and was responsible for the development, fabrication, and installation of the Advanced LIGOÂ laser subsystem and its stabilization.

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Transaction Control – A functional approach to modular transaction management

Tim Ward [Paremus] | 10:15-10:50 – 27/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

Transactions are a critical part of almost all Enterprise applications, but correctly managing those transactions isn’t always easy. This is particularly true in a dynamic, modular world where you need to be certain that everything is ready before you begin.

With the advent of lambda expressions and functional interfaces we now have new, better tools for defining transactional work. The OSGi Transaction Control service uses these functional programming techniques to scope transactions and resource access, providing control and flexibility while leaving business logic uncluttered. The resulting solution is decoupled, modular and requires no container magic at all, making testing and portability a breeze.

Background
Software controlled transactions have existed for a long time — commercial products that are still available now can trace their origins back to the 1960s. Since that time a lot has changed, first we saw the rise of C, then of Object Oriented programming, then of the Web, and now of Microservices.

Over the same time period there have been significant changes to the way that transactions are managed – either transaction boundaries have to be explicitly declared, or the management role is delegated to a container technology. Given the complexity of correctly managing the transaction lifecycle, container managed solutions are regarded as the gold standard, however container managed solutions introduce their own problems.

The rise of the Spring framework was a reaction to the complexity, and heavy-touch management of the original Java EE specifications. Instead Spring focussed on “pure POJO” programming, designed to make your code easily portable, runnable and testable inside or outside the container.

While Spring did a much better job of hiding complexity than those early Java EE servers, the fundamental problem with any pure declarative approach is that there must be a container somewhere. Without a container there is no code to start or end the transaction. Even now with Spring, EJB 3.2, CDI etc, the promise of simpler, container independent components is an illusion.

The big problem with declarative transaction management is that it tries to take away too much from the application code, replacing it with “container magic”. The problem with relying on magic is that the resulting system ends up being more complex, not less. We therefore should be aiming to simplify and minimise transaction management code, not eliminate it entirely. Java’s support for functional techniques opens a whole new set of API possibilities for transaction management, and the Apache Aries project has been exploring the possibilities of providing generic resource and transaction management in a concise, type-safe way. Examples from this project demonstrate how transaction management can be made both simple and explicit at the same time.

Speaker Bio:

Tim Ward is CTO at Paremus Ltd, a co-author of Enterprise OSGi in Action, and has been actively working with OSGi for over seven years. Tim has been a regular participant in the OSGi Core Platform and Enterprise Expert Groups, and is interim chair of the OSGi IoT Expert Group. Tim has led development of several specifications within OSGi. Tim is also an active Open Source committer. Tim contributes regularly to Bndtools and is a PMC member in the Apache Aries project.

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WebSockets and Equinox OSGi in a Servlet Container

Nedelcho Delchev [SAP] | 11:00-11:35 – 27/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Advanced

How to use WebSockets, coming as a standard feature with the modern Servlet Containers (e.g. Tomcat 7.x) from within the embedded Equinox OSGi environment deployed as a WAR application archive?

This talk will explain in details how to configure the classloaders and dependencies as well as how to create a websocket bridge for the internal OSGi plugins.

More details can be found here.

Speaker Bio:

Nedelcho Delchev is Development Architect at SAP Labs Bulgaria in Development Experience & Research for HANA Cloud Platform. He has 14+ years of experience in various programming languages, technologies and architectural styles. Based on the lessons learnt from the past Java EE and SOA times, along with a group of a few colleagues he started SAP’s internal innovation project targeting a new approach for Cloud Development. The project name is Dirigible. It focuses on the simplest yet common use-cases and provides full-fledged capabilities for developing, running and operating cloud applications – http://www.dirigible.io.

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Getting started with OSGi declarative services

Dirk Fauth [Robert Bosch GmbH] | 13:00-13:35 – 27/10/2016 | Schubartsaal

Abstract:
Experience level: Beginner

OSGi declarative services exist for a long time and are used to implement a modular service-oriented architecture. Because of the supported dynamics, the easy way to define, register and consume services, declarative services can be found in various scenarios. With Eclipse 4 for example, declarative services are therefore used more often than the Equinox specific extension points.

In this session I will give an introduction to declarative services in general. How to create and use them in combination with the DS annotations. This session will focus on the usage of Bndtools and Felix SCR to also show some of the features introduced with DS spec 1.3.

I published a Getting Started Tutorial that covers in general the contents of this session:

http://blog.vogella.com/2016/06/21/getting-started-with-osgi-declarative…

Speaker Bio:

Dirk Fauth is a Software Architect for Rich Client Systems working for the Robert Bosch GmbH in Stuttgart and a lecturer in Java basics for the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University (DHBW). He is active in developing, teaching and talking about Eclipse RCP applications and Eclipse related technologies. He is project lead of the Nebula NatTable project, Eclipse Platform committer and also a committer and contributor to several other Eclipse projects. He is also blogging about NatTable, Eclipse and OSGi on http://blog.vogella.com/author/fipro/ and https://blog.codecentric.de/en/author/dirk-fauth/

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